Llain Arenilla and Hawkins Rada: Climate Change and Forced Migration



INTRODUCTION

In the last decades, climate change has been one of the most important and controversial issues of discussion among scientists, governments and international organizations considering the potentially threatening consequences that this phenomenon may bring to the life forms of this planet. This topic has been on the agenda of the United Nations since the first World Climate Conference, in 1979. Further, it was included in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, where Goal 13 urges us to “[…] take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts” (UN General Assembly, 2015, p. 14). In this regard, changing weather patterns, rising sea level, and extreme weather events have been recognized by the UN General Assembly (2015) as consequences of climate change, which are circumstances that affect all nations and especially the poorest, most vulnerable people.

Recently, the first international agreement on climate change was negotiated and signed. This was the result of the Paris Climate Conference (COP21) in December 2015, held by the United Nations, where 195 countries participated and “[…] adopted the first-ever universal, legally binding global climate deal” (European Commission, 2016, para. 4). It has been said that this was an enormous effort to acknowledge the existence and negative effects of climate change and, at that moment, the agreement recognized several issues, among which the relationship between climate change, forced migration, and human rights was counted. Accordingly, the Paris Agreement establishes that:

Acknowledging that climate change is a common concern of humankind, Parties should, when taking action to address climate change, respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity ( United Nations, 2015, pp.1-2 ).

However, this recognition is insufficient since the agreement lacks the depth to create a regulatory framework that promotes the defense of the rights of those individuals forced to flee their countries due to climate change. As a result, this paper aims to address the challenges climate change may impose on Nation-States concerning human rights, especially in relation to those who must migrate across borders. Therefore, the relationship between climate change and forced migration will be studied, in order to present the problems arising from the allocation of international responsibility among States on this subject and the international protection (or the lack thereof) that instruments such as the Convention on the Status of Refugees of 1951, the 1984 Cartagena Declaration, and the Organization of African Unity (OAU) Convention might offer to climate migrants. Finally, the potential increase of stateless persons caused by the disappearance of Nation-States under climate change and the normative framework that should be implemented to provide an effective solution to this situation will be analyzed.

ESTABLISHING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE AND FORCED MIGRATION

Currently, the study of the relationship between climate change and forced migration has led to the conclusion that the impacts of climate change, especially those related to water shortage and hostile weather conditions, will make life conditions extremely difficult in some parts of the world (considering it will cause loss of livelihood, employment, lands, infrastructure, violence, and conflict, among others), or it will make many places uninhabitable, which will bring as a consequence an increase in forced migration (Toscano, 2017).3

According to Zetter (2015) extreme environmental events will cause, directly and indirectly, an increase in human migration and displacement, because of three conditions described by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP): 1) the effects of warming, which will affect agricultural production, and will produce degradation of the ecosystem; 2) the increase in extreme weather events —especially heavy rainfall and resulting flash or river floods in tropical regions—, and 3) the sea-level rise, which will permanently destroy extensive low-lying coastal areas (Zetter, 2015, pp. 3-4).

However, it is important to address that many scholars consider that more research is needed in the establishment of a relationship between climate change and migration. They have put forward claims such as the uncertainty of the effects of climate change on migration, the question around the exact number of people who will be migrating because of climate change,4 and the difficulties in distinguishing populations forced to migrate because of climate change from populations forced to migrate as a result of environmental factors or other types of factors. In addition, multi-causality has led scholars to point out that climate change is just one of the factors that exacerbate migration, mostly on a temporal basis and within the same country (Thornton, 2012, p. 148; Kibreab, 2009, pp. 360, 388).

It has to be acknowledged that climate change may not be the only or main driver of migration, but it is a source of pending risk that needs to be considered in any national or international policy designed to address the consequences of climate change. In this respect, Toscano (2017) asserted that climate change is a “threat multiplier” and multi-causality does not mean that climate change is not an important factor that induces migration. Thus, despite the lack of consensus on the main reason for human migration, the effects of climate change (i.e., droughts, floods, loss of land, rising temperatures, and rising sea levels) will force migration or will leave populations to endure its direct impacts (Toscano, 2017, p. 462; Kuusipalo, 2017, p. 618).

In terms of migration categories, climate change will produce internally displaced persons (IDPs), climate migrants, and statelessness. In addition, researchers have established a new category: “trapped population,” which is encompassed by persons who are not able to migrate either internally or externally due to the lack of financial means or other factors (Black, Arnell, Adger, Thomas, & Geddes, 2012; Black & Collyer, 2014; Kuusipalo, 2017). Consequently, the link between climate change and migration exists and, as reported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights – OHCHR (2009), it brings drastic consequences on fundamental human rights such as the right to life, food, work, and housing, with the population in low-income countries being the most affected.

CHALLENGES IN THE RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS IN FORCED MIGRATION

The international protection of climate migrants faces great challenges. The first one is the political will of States, especially the developed countries, to put in place legal and technical measures to prevent or mitigate the consequences of climate change in relation to migration. The second one is the lack of a legal framework designed specifically to address the rights of climate migrants and the duties of Nation-States towards them.

Political Will

At this stage, the question is whether there is a political will between Nation-States to reach a consensus to give a real and meaningful solution to climate migration. The answer somehow has been influenced by the on-going debate among Nation-States, NGOs, scholars, and International Organizations around the intensity of the effects of climate change, which causes alterations to the decision-making process of Nation-States in relation to possible solutions. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2014) has pointed out that “[…] responding to climate-related risks involves decision making in a changing world, with continuing uncertainty about the severity and timing of climate-change impacts and with limits to the effectiveness of adaptation” (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2014, p. 9). In this respect, the debate among scholars is composed by those who consider that one of the impacts of climate change is forced migration (maximalist) and those who consider that migration on account of climate change will be only “indirect or multifaceted” (minimalist) (Gogarty, 2011, p. 175; Thornton, 2012, p. 149; Mayer, 2013, p. 3).

Consequently, while there is recognition by Nation-States regarding climate change as a new factor of migration, the uncertainty about the scope of the problem has prevented them from reaching a consensus over possible solutions from the financial and legal viewpoint.

According to Wyman (2013), precisely, these two aspects are gaps in the law and policy on climate change migration. Wyman (2013) describes them as the “rights gap” and the “funding gap,” where the first refers to the “lack of a right in existing law to remain permanently in another country due to environmental conditions in the home country” and the latter to the “lack of a dedicated source of international funding to help offset the costs that developing countries may incur in dealing with climate change migration” (2013, p. 169).

In this respect, putting the topic of climate change and forced migration at the center of the political discussion will set the path policy makers should follow in order to design methods that will provide financial and legal protection to the populations vulnerable to these situations. In addition, it is necessary to consider migration as an adaptation strategy:

“[…] where key policy responses to environmental migration should include protection and supportive services for migrants, such as investing in the environmentally impacted regions to reduce the flow of migrants, investing in host regions to help relieve them of the burdens on infrastructure due to receiving a substantial number of migrants, and considering rights-based resettlement efforts for populations directly displaced by the effects of climate change” ( Toscano, 2017, pp. 474-475 ).

Legal Framework

Building a new legal framework to address climate migration, in which there is recognition of a new category of persons worthy of international protection or finding legal protection for environmentally displaced people within the international refugee law framework has been proven extremely difficult.

In the first place, political will is needed, as explain by Feijen (2012), to get Nation-States to agree to share burdens and to accept to give immigration status to those people displaced across borders because of climate change (2012, pp. 63-64). In the second place, even though some commentators such as Burleson (2010) have affirmed that amending the existing refugee law framework will “[…] end the legal limbo that future ecomigrants face” (2010, p. 22), the lack of political will is evident and this option seems less plausible.5 Nowadays, the fundamental structure of refugee protection is in crisis, and rather than being willing to negotiate a new agreement to offer more protection to vulnerable populations, governments are negotiating agreements that allow them to circumvent principles as important as the principle of non-refoulement.6 In the third place, the legal possibility or even the convenience of using international refugee law to afford protection to climate migrants, also called by some scholars as “climate refugees,”7 is highly controversial.

With regard to this last issue, it is important to point out that under international refugee law, mostly the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees (hereinafter the 1951 Convention) and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, the concept of refugee is very restrictive and even more so if it is considered that many States “tend to establish policies to keep refugees outside their jurisdiction, and, consequently, imperil the protection set up by the 1951 Convention” (Llain, 2015, p. 289). Consequently, it does not include persons in need of international protection beyond those individuals who possess a well- founded fear of being persecuted because of their race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion, and who for one of these reasons, are outside their country of nationality or habitual residence, and are unable or unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of that country.

The report of the Nansen Conference on Climate Change and Displacement stresses that “A fundamental concern is that while refugees from war and persecution are protected by international conventions, it is unclear what laws and policies protect people displaced across international borders by extreme weather events” (Norwegian Refugee Council, 2011, p. 3).

In addition, even though “climate refugees” have a well-founded fear for fleeing their countries and can be considered as members of a particular social group, (one can argue they share as a common characteristic being affected by climate change, e.g. extreme weather or some other extreme event), authors like McAdam (2011) have stated that the concept provided by the 1951 Convention does not apply to climate refugees because climate change cannot be characterized as “persecution.” Thus, persecution is a fundamental element of the concept of refugees. In this case, there is not a “persecutor” who may be identified,8 and the persecution needs to be on account of one of the five motives set in the 1951 Convention. McAdam (2011), also reasoned that “[…] an argument that people affected by its impacts could constitute a ‘particular social group’ would be difficult to establish, because the law requires that the group must be connected by a fundamental, immutable characteristic other than the risk of persecution itself” (2011, p. 13).

A SEPARATE CHALLENGE: STATELESSNESS AS A CONSEQUENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE

Statelessness has become an imminent risk due to climate change, as the increase in sea levels may sink, in the future, low-lying States, known as Sinking Island States (Vidas, 2014). Nations such as The Maldives, Kiribati, Tuvalu, and the Marshall Islands have experienced examples of this reality. In those States, the population will have to leave their countries because of climate change and will become stateless when the existence of their State ends (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2009). Even though some authors doubt that this situation will actually happen soon (Barnett, 2017), the uninhabitability of certain territories is beginning to cause forced migration, considering cases such as the Carteret Islands, where 1,000 residents were evacuated to Bougainville as a consequence of storm-related erosion and saltwater intrusion (Brown, 2007).

This impact of climate change will particularly affect islands in the Pacific. Thus, by 2050, 665,000 to 1.7 million people in the Pacific Islands could be forced to migrate to another country. Estimates have indicated that Kiribati and The Maldives could disappear completely in the next 30 to 60 years, as well as Tuvalu, which may disappear in the following 50 years (Tomkiw, 2015).

Also, it is possible to say that the consequences of climate change, and particularly those related to rising sea levels, could begin before expected because the territory could become uninhabitable before its disappearance. Some States have already been affected by climate change impacts such as temporary floods, tropical storms, tides, and coastal erosion: phenomena that are able to destroy the territory of a State. For example, Tuvalu is affected periodically by floods causing contamination and the destruction of houses. Similarly, in 2004, The Maldives were almost completely submerged, as a result of a tsunami, equally since then the tides have flooded 80 of the islands (Park & UNHCR, 2011).

Statehood and Climate Change

As explained above, there is a probability that statelessness will increase due to the disappearance of certain States. Under Customary International Law, a State is considered as such, when it has: 1) a defined territory, 2) a permanent population, 3) a government, and 4) capacity to enter relations with other States. This concept has been established in international instruments such as the 1933 Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States.

In these terms, territory is a key element in the concept of State. Therefore, according to the terms set out by International Law, an entity cannot claim statehood without a territory. (Crawford, 1977; Zounuzy, 2012). Furthermore, it should be considered that without it, there is an impossibility to meet the other elements in the concept of State, especially because of the relationship between the territory and the permanent population, as inhabitants share an intimate bond with the territory they live in. This does not mean that the entire population must live in the territory of the State; considering that the criteria in the Convention are independent, at least a portion of the population must live in the territory, and that is why an implied nexus between the State’s territory and the permanent population exists (Jan, 2011).

In this regard, the Sinking Island States case is unique, because of the lack of a successor State to replace the preceding one. Even when International Law applies to the continuity presumption, there are no precedents for the loss of the entire territory of a State or the migration of its entire population (McAdam, 2010), creating de jure statelessness for the people involved because they could not become nationals of other States according to the receiving State’s laws (Park & UNHCR, 2011).

International law has not developed any precedence for the disappearance of a State; it has only regulated cases of: “(i) absorption (by another State), merger (with another State) and dissolution (with the emergence of successor States)” (McAdam, 2010, p. 2), and the difference between these cases and the extinction of a State because of climate change is that “[…] the territory it abandons will not (cannot) be assumed by any other State” (McAdam, 2010, p. 2). In this sense, the principle of presumption of continuity of State existence cannot overrule that the territory becomes uninhabitable, a necessary condition of statehood. If the population of a Nation-State with uninhabitable or disappeared territory has no other nationality, they will be de jure stateless, and the difficulty regarding statelessness is not just the right to nationality, but other rights that depend on the recognition as a national of a certain State (Alexander & Simon, 2014).

On the other hand, international human rights law has established the duty of readmission as an obligation regarding statelessness. The duty of readmission relates to the capability of Nations-States to readmitting their nationals as a minimal requirement to prevent statelessness. Considering this duty, it would be impossible for States with an uninhabitable or disappeared territory to have the capability of readmitting their nationals who suffered from the impacts of climate change (Alexander & Simon, 2017).

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO ADDRESS CLIMATE MIGRATION

To Explore Opportunities of Protection Within the International Human Rights Law Framework

Nation-States have concentrated their efforts on the design of prevention, mitigation, and adaptation plans to cope with climate change and its adverse impacts. In addition, international cooperation has been set in terms of funding those plans and projects in least developed countries. However, the main issue, concerning human lives, is how to provide legal protection to the populations affected by climate change to guarantee their fundamental human rights.

In this context, providing legal protection means not only establishing policies to ensure financial, logistical and technical assistance for adaptation, or even relocation, but also interpreting migration policies in accordance with international human rights obligations to facilitate the exercise of the climate migrant’s rights. Therefore, it is important to explore opportunities of protection within the international human rights law framework, which will not need political will for amendments or the creation of new rules and which can be implemented through the regional human rights systems.

Concurring with this idea, Chapman (2010) stated that regional systems (European, Inter- American and African systems) have the potential to be used to address issues in regard to climate change and, “[…] in evaluating the potential fate of a petition based on human rights violations resulting from climate change, each of the three established systems has its own strengths” (2010, p. 37).

For instance, in the Inter-American Human Rights System, the general duty of prevention is well developed in the doctrine and jurisprudence of both the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACtHR). The IACtHR has ruled that the Contracting States (of the American Convention on Human Rights) have the obligation to take reasonable steps to prevent violations of human rights.9 This means that in a situation of real, actual, and immediate risk of violation of human rights, known by the State and its authorities, the State must take all the necessary and reasonable legal, political, administrative, and cultural measures to prevent and avoid that risk.10

Applying this reasoning, climate change can be considered a genuine, present, and immediate risk to the human rights of the individuals forced to flee their places of origin on account of this factor: a risk that is known by Nation-States. Therefore, they have the responsibility to take actions to prevent the impacts of climate change (United Nations, 2015) in regard to forced migration, adopting legal norms as well as other types of acts to assist those affected in maintaining their rights.11

In addition, regional instruments such as the Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights “Protocol of San Salvador” in its Article 11, recognizes the right to a healthy environment, which also had been used as the base for petitions before the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights (ACHPR), an entity that has found States in violation of their associated obligations (Chapman, 2010).

In the Inter-American System, although few cases exist on this subject,12 the IACtHR has noted that an undeniable link between the protection of the environment and the enjoyment of other human rights can be found.13 Also, the IACtHR (2009) has said that “the ways in which the environmental degradation and the adverse effects of climate change have impaired the effective enjoyment of human rights in the continent has been the subject of discussion by the General Assembly of the Organization of American States and the United Nations”14 (para. 148).

Furthermore, as explained by the Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente (Inter-American Association for Environmental Defense) (2008), the recognition of this right, as a human right, implies that States must make resources available and take actions to guarantee this. In addition to the above, it is noteworthy that in the Inter-American Human Rights System, the right to a healthy environment reaches a connotation beyond being a human right, as the Inter-American Democratic Charter, in its Article 15, also recognizes it as an aim of democracy (Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente, 2008).

Consequently, an approach based on human rights needs to guide the design and implementation of the law and policy as well as the political discourse. According to Aminzadeh (2007), this approach “[…] would integrate the theoretical and advocacy approaches of environmental law and human rights law” (2007, p. 258). In this respect, strategies such as “[…] 1) the application of procedural rights found in International Human rights Law to climate change litigation; 2) the recognition of a distinct right to environmental well-being; and 3) the re-interpretation of existing human rights in the environmental context” may be viable to offer an effective solution for the aforementioned protection of climate migrants (Aminzadeh, 2007, p. 245).

Evolutionary Interpretation of the Principle of Non-Refoulement

As explained earlier the current international refugee law framework does not fit climate migrants. Under this scenario, the most cost-effective solution is to give the principle of non- refoulement an evolutionary interpretation, in order to expand the protections offered by the principle to climate migrants.15 In this regard, it is important to point out that for purposes of the interpretation of international human rights law treaties, the same should be done attending the pro homine principle “[…] that is, that they should be interpreted in the way which is most protective of human rights” (Lixinski, 2010, p. 588).

Thus, an evolutionary interpretation of the principle of non-refoulement, based on the concept of respect to human dignity, may lead to the establishment of international responsibility of States in this topic and to create a cause of action for climate migrants when they are denied protection. Regarding this topic, the IACHR has stated that respect for the inherent dignity of the person is the principle on which the fundamental protections of the right to life and the preservation of physical well-being are based. The conditions of severe environmental pollution, which can cause serious physical illness, disability, and suffering to the local population, are incompatible with the right to be respected as a human being (Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente, 2008, p. 54).

Accordingly, the evolutionary interpretation of the rights consecrated in international human rights law instruments must play an important role in giving the principle of non- refoulement an extended scope. International human rights bodies, such as the IACtHR (1999), have used this form of interpretation, explaining that “[…] human rights treaties are living instruments whose interpretation must consider the changes over time and present- day conditions”16 (1999, para. 114).

As a consequence, when considering the protection that may be provided to climate migrants, the applicable international instruments should be connected with the circumstances of the case; that climate change is a real and imminent risk, as explained earlier, known by States; and that these circumstances cause several violations to human rights. According to Naser (2010), migrants in this situation are especially affected in their rights to life, health, food, and shelter. For that reason, there is a growing insistence that a “policy framework should be developed to protect, respect, and promote the human rights of the affected people” (2010, p. 119).

On this subject, McAdam (2011) stated that the best way to apply the principle of non- refoulement to climate change is by connecting it to the right to life and the right to not to be subjected to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment because those rights “[…] are clearly recognized in International Law as giving rise to such an obligation, and which have been incorporated into a number of domestic complementary protection regimes” (2011, p. 18). As a result, States will have the general duty to protect and not return or expel vulnerable populations to places where their lives will be at risk of harm due to the effects of climate change.

Finally, changes over time and present-day conditions have been a cause to urge for an expansion of the concept of refugee. For instance, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has exhorted States to implement expanded refugee definitions such as those adopted in the Cartagena Declaration or the OAU Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa (Llain, 2015, p. 290). Under those instruments, additional reasons may trigger the international protection available for refugees, such as external aggression, occupation, foreign domination or events seriously disturbing public order in either a part or the whole country of origin or nationality, and the massive violation of human rights (added by the Cartagena Declaration). It is an unresolved task to analyze whether factors such as “events seriously disturbing public order” may be interpreted in favor of giving international protection under the status of refugee to those suffering from the adverse impacts of climate change.17 However, Warren (2016) has pointed out that “under either expanded definition, a natural disaster could arguably constitute a circumstance that “disturb[s] the public order,” but neither was explicitly intended to cover environmental displacement” (2016, p. 2123). Consequently, it is time, once again, to call for a broader interpretation that may introduce, at both municipal and international law levels, considerations related to the status of climate migrants.

Complementary Protection, Durable Solutions: Voluntary Repatriation, Resettlement, and Integration

The principle of non-refoulement provides an additional obligation that could be a solution to climate migrants, considering the universal refugee instruments and customary international refugee law. The complementary protection refers to the mechanism to grant international protection to persons who do not meet the established requirements to be considered as a refugee in the scope of the 1951 Convention (Mandal, 2005).

This obligation is based on the provisions prohibiting the expulsion of individuals from the territory of a Nation-State, and the international responsibility of a State on acts or omissions when individuals are in need of international protection because of the risk to their human rights (Mandal, 2005).

In this sense, Nation-States must develop systems of complementary protection, which seek to apply international law obligations and prevent the violation of the human rights of those facing the climate change impacts. Even though the complementary protection could need a substantial development to address climate change challenges, it does not preclude climate change from being recognized as a source of inhuman treatment to obligate Nation- States to grant the protection (McAdam, 2011). In the words of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (2015):

The measures of complementary protection make it possible to regularize the stay of persons who are not recognized as refugees but whose return would be contrary to the general obligations of non-refoulement, contained in various human rights instruments ( Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, 2015, para. 133 ).

Also, the durable solutions for refugees that could be applied to address climate forced migration, voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement, are measures that may help to mitigate the climate change impacts on migration. Nation-States should operationalize solutions for climate migrants based on the needs of international protection, considering:

  • Undertaking activities to facilitate voluntary repatriation and sustainable reintegration, in cooperation with relevant partners, as well as post-return monitoring.

  • Exploring local integration options for certain groups, such as leave to remain and naturalization.

  • Exploring resettlement options and quotas for specific groups, using resettlement strategically and coordinating resettlement needs with a view to adopting a region- wide approach (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2007, p. 187).

Preventive Measures in Case of Statelessness

As mentioned above, statelessness as a consequence of climate change will be difficult to address, considering the lack of regulation and the novelty of the new situation of statelessness. Therefore, it is particularly important to take preventive measures that involve: 1) reduction of the impact of climate change, and 2) preparation for the moment when different States become uninhabitable. The fact that climate change is a reality cannot be ignored and international law must be prepared, according to the existing regulation on international human rights laws. In this sense, “the severity of the challenges would depend on the progression of sea-level rise. Initially, drastic consequences would affect only some low-lying States—in particular, several Pacific and Indian Ocean island-States” (Vidas, 2014, p. 73).

Consequently, international regulation concerning stateless persons as a result of climate change should be based on the importance of having a nationality, with the purpose of creating a special system of protection in receiving States, giving obligations and rights allowing the stateless person to keep his or her life and to adapt in the receiving State.

Also, the recognition of the stateless status is not enough to guarantee the protection of human rights of the person forced to migrate as a consequence of the uninhabitability or disappearance of the territory of their State, but it should be the beginning point for the development of legal measures to address this challenge.

CONCLUSION

As has been mentioned before, the impacts of climate change are starting to be revealed before the world expected them “[…] climate change continues unabated, there is a growing population of displaced men, women, and children whose homes have been rendered unlivable thanks to a wide spectrum of environmental disasters” (Lam, 2012, para. 1). That spectrum includes damage to settlements and infrastructure; alteration of ecosystems; disruption of water supply and food production; mortality; incidence of diseases and poor health, as a result of floods, wildfires, cyclones, heatwaves, and droughts caused by climate change (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2014, p. 6), all of which have an impact on human society.

The number of environmentally affected and future stateless people in the world has started to rise and will continue to increase. Native Alaskans and low-lying island States of Oceania are the first communities facing climate change because of their geographic location and the traditional livelihoods that make them vulnerable to the difficulties of a warming world (Mellino, 2016, para. 3).

In the future, the estimation is that there will be “[…] from 25 million to 1 billion environmental migrants by 2050, moving either within their countries or across borders, on a permanent or temporary basis, with 200 million being the most widely cited estimate” (International Organization for Migration, n.d., para. 15). Furthermore, considering the estimate of 200 million environmental refugees by 2050, this number:

[…] represent[s] nearly a four-fold increase in the number of displaced persons and refugees currently eligible for protection under the UNHCR mandate. And in 2007, the IPCC suggested that more than 600 million people currently living in low-lying coastal zones –438 million in Asia and 246 million in least developed countries– will be directly at risk to potential threats of climate change in this century. The so-called ‘climate hotspots’ – low-lying islands, coastal regions, large river deltas, and underdeveloped regions– remain in danger of catastrophic environmental change. Under current International Law, any climate-induced, cross-border migrations from these areas would trigger little if any protections or assistance mechanisms that could help provide aid to them ( Glahn, 2009, para. 13 ).

In view of the above, it is possible to say that the principal cause of statelessness is not only rising sea levels but also, environmental disasters, the lack of natural resources, and problems with food production and water supply.

The impacts of climate change are real and cannot be ignored. Millions will be internally displaced or will have to flee their countries on account of climate change. Also, entire populations could be forced to move to other countries since the disappearance of their States seems inevitable. Nevertheless, the relevant issue here is to prevent this catastrophe through the adoption of legislative measures at both the internal and international law levels to provide appropriate legal protection in accordance with present and future human rights standards.

Referencias

1

Alexander, H., & Simon, J. (2014). Sinking Into Statelessness. Tilburg Law Review, 19(1- 2), 20-25. doi:10.1163/22112596-01902003

2014Sinking Into Statelessness H. Alexander J. Simon Tilburg Law Review191- 2202510.1163/22112596-01902003

2

Alexander, H., & Simon, J. (2017). No Port, No Passport: Why Submerged States Can Have no Nationals. Washington International Law Journal Association, 26(2), 307-324.

2017No Port, No Passport: Why Submerged States Can Have no Nationals H. Alexander J. Simon Washington International Law Journal Association262307324

3

Aminzadeh, S. (2007). A Moral Imperative: The Human Rights Implications of Climate Change. Hastings International & Comparative Law Review, 30, 231- 265.

2007A Moral Imperative: The Human Rights Implications of Climate Change S. Aminzadeh Hastings International & Comparative Law Review30231265

4

Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente. (2008). Guía de defensa ambiental: Construyendo la estrategia para el litigio de casos ante el Sistema Interamericano de Derechos Humanos. Mexico: AIDA.

2008 Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente Guía de defensa ambiental: Construyendo la estrategia para el litigio de casos ante el Sistema Interamericano de Derechos HumanosMexicoAIDA

5

Barnett, J. (2017). The dilemmas of normalising losses from climate change: Towards hope for Pacific atoll countries. Asia Pacific Viewpoint, 58(1), 3-13. doi: 10.1111/apv.12153

2017The dilemmas of normalising losses from climate change: Towards hope for Pacific atoll countries J. Barnett Asia Pacific Viewpoint58131310.1111/apv.12153

6

Bates, D. (2002). Environmental Refugees? Classifying Human Migrations Caused by Environmental Change. Population and Environment, 23(5), 465-477.

2002Environmental Refugees? Classifying Human Migrations Caused by Environmental Change D. Bates Population and Environment235465477

7

Black, R., & Collyer, M. (2014). Populations ‘trapped’ at times of crisis. Retrieved from http://www.fmreview.org/sites/fmr/files/FMRdownloads/en/crisis/black-collyer.pdf

2014 R. Black M. Collyer Populations ‘trapped’ at times of crisis http://www.fmreview.org/sites/fmr/files/FMRdownloads/en/crisis/black-collyer.pdf

8

Black, R., Arnell, N. W., Adger, W. N., Thomas, D., & Geddes, T. (2012). Migration, environmental change, and the ‘challenges of governance’. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 30, 951 – 967.

2012Migration, environmental change, and the ‘challenges of governance’ R. Black N. W. Arnell W. N. Adger D. Thomas T. Geddes Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy30951967

9

Brown, O. (2007). Climate Change and Forced Migration: observations, projections and implications. (Rep. No. 2007/17). Retrieved from https://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/climate_forced_migration.pdf

2007 O. Brown Climate Change and Forced Migration: observations, projections and implications2007/17 https://www.iisd.org/sites/default/files/publications/climate_forced_migration.pdf

10

Burleson, E. (2010). Climate Change Displacement to Refugee. Journal of Environmental Law & Litigation, 25, 19-36.

2010Climate Change Displacement to Refugee E. Burleson Journal of Environmental Law & Litigation251936

11

Chapman, M. (2010). Climate Change and the Regional Human Rights Systems. Sustainable Development Law & Policy, 37-38, 60-61.

2010Climate Change and the Regional Human Rights Systems M. Chapman Sustainable Development Law & Policy37-386061

12

Crawford, J. (1977). The criteria for statehood in international law. British Yearbook of International Law, 48(1), 93–182. doi.org/10.1093/bybil/48.1.93

1977The criteria for statehood in international law J. Crawford British Yearbook of International Law4819318210.1093/bybil/48.1.93

13

European Commission. (2016). Climate Change: Paris Agreement. Retrieved from https://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/international/negotiations_en

2016 European Commission Climate Change: Paris Agreement https://ec.europa.eu/clima/policies/international/negotiations_en

14

Feijen, L. (2012). Jane McAdam: Climate Change, Forced Migration, and International Law. Merkourios: Utrecht Journal of International and European Law, 28(75), Book Review, 61-64.

2012Jane McAdam: Climate Change, Forced Migration, and International Law L. Feijen Merkourios: Utrecht Journal of International and European Law28756164

15

Fujibayashi, H., & Nakayama, M. (2017). An Option to Avoid the Sudden Mass Influx of Migrants Resulting from Worldwide Environmental Threats. International Journal of Social Science Studies, 5(6), 1-8. doi: 10.11114/ijsss.v5i6.2397.

2017An Option to Avoid the Sudden Mass Influx of Migrants Resulting from Worldwide Environmental Threats H. Fujibayashi M. Nakayama International Journal of Social Science Studies561810.11114/ijsss.v5i6.2397

16

Glahn, B. (2009, June 11). 'Climate refugees'? Addressing the international legal gaps - Benjamin Glahn. The International Bar Association. Retrieved from  https://www.ibanet.org/Article/NewDetail.aspx?ArticleUid=B51C02C1-3C27-4AE3-B4C4-7E350EB0F442

2009'Climate refugees'? Addressing the international legal gaps - Benjamin Glahn B. Glahn The International Bar Association https://www.ibanet.org/Article/NewDetail.aspx?ArticleUid=B51C02C1-3C27-4AE3-B4C4-7E350EB0F442

17

Gogarty, B. (2011). Climate-Change Displacement: Current Legal Solutions to Future Global Problems. Journal of Law, Information and Science, 21(1),167-188.

2011Climate-Change Displacement: Current Legal Solutions to Future Global Problems B. Gogarty Journal of Law, Information and Science211167188

18

IACtHR. Case of Kawas Fernández v. Honduras. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of April 3, 2009. Series C No. 196.

2009Case of Kawas Fernández v. Honduras. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 196

19

IACtHR. Case of Luna López v. Honduras. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of October 10, 2013a. Series C No. 269.

2013Case of Luna López v. Honduras. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 269

20

IACtHR. Case of Osorio Rivera and Family members v. Peru. Preliminary Objections, Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of November 26, 2013b. Series C No. 274.

2013Case of Osorio Rivera and Family members v. Peru. Preliminary Objections, Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 274

21

IACtHR. Case of the Mayagna (Sumo) Awas Tingni Community v. Nicaragua. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of August 31, 2001. Series C No. 79.

2001Case of the Mayagna [Sumo] Awas Tingni Community v. Nicaragua. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 79

22

IACtHR. Case of the Pueblo Bello Massacre v. Colombia. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of January 31, 2006a. Series C No. 140.

2006Case of the Pueblo Bello Massacre v. Colombia. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 140

23

IACtHR. Case of the Sawhoyamaxa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of March 29, 2006b. Series C No. 146.

2006Case of the Sawhoyamaxa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 146

24

IACtHR. Case of the Xákmok Kásek Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of August 24, 2010. Series C No. 214.

2010Case of the Xákmok Kásek Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 214

25

IACtHR. Case of the Yakye Axa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs. Judgment of June 17, 2005. Series C No. 125.

2005Case of the Yakye Axa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay. Merits, Reparations, and Costs IACtHR IACtHRJudgment Series C No. 125

26

IACtHR. The Environment and Human Rights (State obligations in relation to the environment in the context of the protection and guarantee of the rights to life and to personal integrity: interpretation and scope of Articles 4(1) and 5(1), in relation to Articles 1(1) and 2 of the American Convention on Human Rights). Advisory Opinion OC-23/17 of November 15, 2017. Series A No. 23.

2017The Environment and Human Rights - State obligations in relation to the environment in the context of the protection and guarantee of the rights to life and to personal integrity: interpretation and scope of Articles 4(1) and 5(1), in relation to Articles 1(1) and 2 of the American Convention on Human Rights IACtHR IACtHRAdvisory Opinion OC-23/17 Series A No. 23

27

IACtHR. The Right to Information on Consular Assistance in the Framework of the Guarantees of the due Process of Law. Advisory Opinion OC-16/99 of October 1, 1999. Series A No. 16.

1999The Right to Information on Consular Assistance in the Framework of the Guarantees of the due Process of Law IACtHR IACtHRAdvisory Opinion OC-16/99 Series A No. 16

28

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. (2015). Human Mobility, Inter-American Standards. I. Title. II. Series: OAS. Official records; OEA/Ser.L.

2015Human Mobility, Inter-American Standards Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Inter-American Commission on Human RightsI. Title. II. Series: OAS. Official records; OEA/Ser.L

29

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2014). Summary for policymakers. In C.B. Field, V.R. Barros, D.J Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mastrandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. MacCracken, P.R. Mastrandrea & L.L. White (Eds.), Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (pp. 1-32). Cambridge, U.K & New York, U.S.A: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg2/ar5_wgII_spm_en.pdf

2014Summary for policymakers Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change C. B. Field V. R. Barros D. J. Dokken K. J. Mach M. D. Mastrandrea T. E. Bilir M. Chatterjee K. L. Ebi Y. O. Estrada R. C. Genova B. Girma E. S. Kissel A. N. Levy S. MacCracken P. R. Mastrandrea L. L. White Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change132Cambridge, U.K & New York, U.S.ACambridge University Press http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg2/ar5_wgII_spm_en.pdf

30

International Organization for Migration. (n.d.). Migration, Climate Change and Environment. Retrieved from http://www.iom.int/complex-nexus#estimates

International Organization for Migration Migration, Climate Change and Environment http://www.iom.int/complex-nexus#estimates

31

Jan, H. (2011). Statehood and State Extinction: Sea Level Rise and the Legal Challenges Faced by Low-Lying Island-States (Unpublished Master’s Thesis). University of Groningen. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/6125630/Statehood_and_State_Extinction_Sea_Level_Rise_and_the_Legal_Challenges_Faced_by_Low-Lying_Island-States_Table_of_contents

2011 H. Jan Statehood and State Extinction: Sea Level Rise and the Legal Challenges Faced by Low-Lying Island-StatesUnpublished Master’s ThesisUniversity of Groningen https://www.academia.edu/6125630/Statehood_and_State_Extinction_Sea_Level_Rise_and_the_Legal_Challenges_Faced_by_Low-Lying_Island-States_Table_of_contents

32

Kälin, W., & Schrepfer, N. (2012). Protecting People Crossing Borders in the Context of Climate Change Normative Gaps and Possible Approaches. UNHCR Legal and Protection Policy Research Series. Retrieved de http://www.unhcr.org/4f33f1729.pdf

2012 W. Kälin N. Schrepfer Protecting People Crossing Borders in the Context of Climate Change Normative Gaps and Possible ApproachesUNHCR Legal and Protection Policy Research Series http://www.unhcr.org/4f33f1729.pdf

33

Kibreab, G. (2009). Climate Change and Human Migration: A Tenuous Relationship. Fordham Environmental Law Review, 20 (2), 357-401.

2009Climate Change and Human Migration: A Tenuous Relationship G. Kibreab Fordham Environmental Law Review202357401

34

Kuusipalo, R. (2017). Exiled by Emissions – Climate Change Related Displacement and Migration in International Law: Gaps in Global Governance and the Role of the UN Climate Convention. Vermont Journal of Environmental Law, 18, 614-647.

2017Exiled by Emissions – Climate Change Related Displacement and Migration in International Law: Gaps in Global Governance and the Role of the UN Climate Convention R. Kuusipalo Vermont Journal of Environmental Law18614647

35

Lam, A. (2012, August 23). Number of Environmental Refugees to Grow to 50 Million by 2020. Earth Island Journal. Retrieved from http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/articles/entry/number_of_environmental_refugees_to_grow_to_50_million_by_2020/

2012Number of Environmental Refugees to Grow to 50 Million by 2020 A. Lam Earth Island Journal http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/articles/entry/number_of_environmental_refugees_to_grow_to_50_million_by_2020/

36

Lixinski, L. (2010). Treaty Interpretation by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights: Expansionism at the Service of the Unity of International Law. European Journal of International Law, 21(3), 585–604. doi.org/10.1093/ejil/chq047

2010Treaty Interpretation by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights: Expansionism at the Service of the Unity of International Law L. Lixinski European Journal of International Law21358560410.1093/ejil/chq047

37

Llain, S. (2015). “Violations to the Principle of Non-Refoulement under the Asylum Policy of the United States.” Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional, 15, 283-322.

2015Violations to the Principle of Non-Refoulement under the Asylum Policy of the United States S. Llain Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional15283322

38

Mandal, R. (2005). Protection Mechanisms Outside of the 1951 Convention (“Complementary Protection”) (PPLA/2005/02). Geneva, Switzerland: UNHCR.

2005 R. Mandal Protection Mechanisms Outside of the 1951 Convention (“Complementary Protection”)Geneva, SwitzerlandUNHCRPPLA/2005/02

39

Mayer, B. (2013). Climate Migration Governance. In W. Leal, H. Polo, & A. Singh (Eds.), Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation. Vol. 2, Policy and Climate Change (pp. 828- 838). Berlin: Springer.

2013Climate Migration Governance B. Mayer W. Leal H. Polo A. Singh Handbook of Climate Change Adaptation2Policy and Climate Change828838BerlinSpringer

40

McAdam, J. (2010). ‘Disappearing States’, Statelessness and the Boundaries of International Law. UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2010-2, (2), 1-23. doi:10.5040/9781472565211.ch-006.

2010'Disappearing States’, Statelessness and the Boundaries of International Law J. McAdam UNSW Law Research Paper2010-2212310.5040/9781472565211.ch-006

41

McAdam, J. (2011). Climate Change Displacement and International Law: Complementary Protection Standards (PPLA/2011/03). Geneva, Switzerland: UNHCR.

2011 J. McAdam Climate Change Displacement and International Law: Complementary Protection StandardsGeneva, SwitzerlandUNHCRPPLA/2011/03

42

Mellino, C. (2016, January 05). Meet the World’s First Climate Refugees. EcoWatch. Retrieved from https://www.ecowatch.com/meet-the-worlds-first-climate-refugees-1882143026.html

2016Meet the World’s First Climate Refugees C. Mellino EcoWatch https://www.ecowatch.com/meet-the-worlds-first-climate-refugees-1882143026.html

43

Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States. (1934). Signed at Montevideo, 26 December 1933. Retrieved from https://www.ilsa.org/Jessup/Jessup15/Montevideo%20Convention.pdf

1934 Montevideo Convention on the Rights and Duties of States Signed at Montevideo, 26 December 1933 https://www.ilsa.org/Jessup/Jessup15/Montevideo%20Convention.pdf

44

Naser, M. (2010). Climate Change and Forced Displacement: Obligation of States under International Human Rights Law. Sri Lanka Journal of International Law, 22(2), 117- 164.

2010Climate Change and Forced Displacement: Obligation of States under International Human Rights Law M. Naser Sri Lanka Journal of International Law222117164

45

Norwegian Refugee Council. (2011). The Nansen Conference: Climate Change and Displacement in the 21st Century. Oslo, Norway: Norwegian Refugee Council. Retrieved from http://www.unhcr.org/4ea969729.pdf

2011 Norwegian Refugee Council The Nansen Conference: Climate Change and Displacement in the 21st CenturyOslo, NorwayNorwegian Refugee Council http://www.unhcr.org/4ea969729.pdf

46

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. (2009). Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Relationship Between Climate Change and Human Rights (A/HRC/10/61). Switzerland, Geneva: United Nations.

2009 Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the Relationship Between Climate Change and Human RightsSwitzerland, GenevaUnited NationsA/HRC/10/61

47

Park, S., & UNHCR. (2011). Climate Change and the Risk of Statelessness: The Situation of Low-lying Island States (PPLA/2011/04). Switzerland, Geneva: UNHCR.

2011 S. Park UNHCR Climate Change and the Risk of Statelessness: The Situation of Low-lying Island StatesSwitzerland, GenevaUNHCRPPLA/2011/04

48

Rankin, J. (2016, April 20). Council of Europe condemns EU’s refugee deal with Turkey. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/20/eu-refugee-deal-turkey-condemned-council-of-europe

2016, April 20Council of Europe condemns EU’s refugee deal with Turkey J. Rankin The Guardian https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/20/eu-refugee-deal-turkey-condemned-council-of-europe

49

Thornton, F. (2012). Climate Change, Displacement and International Law: Between Crisis and Ambiguity. Australian Year Book of International Law, 30, 147-160.

2012Climate Change, Displacement and International Law: Between Crisis and Ambiguity F. Thornton Australian Year Book of International Law30147160

50

Tomkiw, L. (2015, October 11). Kiribati Climate Change Relocation Refugee Crisis? Sinking Low-Lying Island Nations In Pacific, Indian Oceans Seeking Solutions Before It's Too Late. International Business Times. Retrieved from http://www.ibtimes.com/kiribati-climate-change-relocation-refugee-crisis-sinking-low-lying-island-nations-2127526

2015, October 11Kiribati Climate Change Relocation Refugee Crisis? Sinking Low-Lying Island Nations In Pacific, Indian Oceans Seeking Solutions Before It's Too Late L. Tomkiw International Business Times http://www.ibtimes.com/kiribati-climate-change-relocation-refugee-crisis-sinking-low-lying-island-nations-2127526

51

Toscano, J. (2017). Climate Change Displacement and Forced Migration: An International Crisis. Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy, 6(1), 457-490.

2017Climate Change Displacement and Forced Migration: An International Crisis J. Toscano Arizona Journal of Environmental Law and Policy61457490

52

UN General Assembly. (2015). Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development A/RES/70/1, p. 14. Retrieved from https://www.refworld.org/docid/57b6e3e44.html

2015 UN General Assembly Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable DevelopmentUN General AssemblyA/RES/70/1 https://www.refworld.org/docid/57b6e3e44.html

53

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. (2004). Brazil Declaration and Plan of Action. Retrieved from https://www.acnur.org/5b5101644.pdf

2004 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Brazil Declaration and Plan of Action https://www.acnur.org/5b5101644.pdf

54

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. (2007). The 10-Point Plan of Action on Refugee Protection and Mixed Migration. Retrieved from http://www.unhcr.org/the-10-point-plan-in-action.html

2007 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees The 10-Point Plan of Action on Refugee Protection and Mixed Migration http://www.unhcr.org/the-10-point-plan-in-action.html

55

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. (2009). Climate Change and Statelessness: An Overview. Bonn, Germany: UNHCR.

2009 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Climate Change and Statelessness: An OverviewBonn, GermanyUNHCR

56

United Nations. (2015). Paris Agreement. Paris: United Nations, I-54113, pp.88-112. Retrieved from https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/No%20Volume/54113/Part/I-54113-0800000280458f37.pdf

2015 United Nations Paris Agreement. Paris: United NationsParisUnited NationsI-54113https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/No%20Volume/54113/Part/I-54113-0800000280458f37.pdf

57

Vidas, D. (2014). Sea-Level Rise and International Law: At the Convergence of Two Epochs. Climate Law, 4, 70-84. doi:10.1163/18786561-00402006.

2014Sea-Level Rise and International Law: At the Convergence of Two Epochs D. Vidas Climate Law4708410.1163/18786561-00402006

58

Warren, P. (2016). Forced Migration after Paris COP21: Evaluating the “Climate Change Displacement Coordination Facility”. Columbia Law Review, 116(8), 2103-2144.

2016Forced Migration after Paris COP21: Evaluating the - Climate Change Displacement Coordination Facility P. Warren Columbia Law Review116821032144

59

Wyman, K. (2013). Responses to Climate Migration. Harvard Environmental Law Review, 37, 167-217.

2013Responses to Climate Migration K. Wyman Harvard Environmental Law Review37167217

60

Zetter, R. (2015). Protection in Crisis: Forced Migration and Protection in a Global Era (Rep.). Retrieved from https://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/protection-crisis-forced-migration-and-protection-global-era

2015 R. Zetter Protection in Crisis: Forced Migration and Protection in a Global Era https://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/protection-crisis-forced-migration-and-protection-global-era

61

Zounuzy, A. (2012). International Law and The Criteria for Statehood (Unpublished Master’s Thesis). University of Tilburg. Retrieved from  http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:nSJmja7PQPIJ:arno.uvt.nl/show.cgi?fid=121942&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=co

2012 A. Zounuzy International Law and The Criteria for StatehoodUnpublished Master’s ThesisUniversity of Tilburg http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:nSJmja7PQPIJ:arno.uvt.nl/show.cgi?fid=121942&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=co

Notas

1 According to Toscano (2017) forced migration within and across the borders “will become increasingly commonplace due to the repercussions of climate change” (p. 140).

2 Even though different estimations have been made by several scholars such as Meyers (1997), Stern (2007), Aid (2007), and UNCHR (2012), the complexity of climate change makes very difficult to determine an exact number of environmentally displaced people (Fujibayashi & Nakayama, 2017, p. 1; Toscano, 2017, p. 474).

3 According to Thornton (2012), “A new generation of legal and policy scholarship has questioned the likelihood or utility of new or revised treaty instruments and with it a protection-based approach” (2012, p. 154). At the same time, Warren (2016) expresses that some commentators fear that amending the Convention will diminish the current protection for refugees (2016, p. 2125).

4 The most recent example of this situation is the European Union-Turkey agreement on refugees that allows Greece to return “irregular migrants” to Turkey. As reported by Rankin (2016), the Council of Europe has condemned the agreement claiming that “[…] [it] exceeds the limits of what is permissible under International Law” (para. 1).

5 This term, along with “environmental refugees,” is normally used to refer to “[…] people who have been forced to leave their traditional habitat, temporarily or permanently, because of a marked environmental disruption that jeopardized their existence and/or seriously affected the quality of their life’’ (Essam El-Hinnawi, 1985, p. 4. Quoted by Bates, 2002, p. 466).

6 See also: Wyman (2013) who considers that climate change is not a form of persecution (p. 179). Also, Gogarty, (2011), explaining that advocacy to have climate migrants be recognized within the 1951 Convention has been futile because critics do not consider climate change the main factor for displacement, and which it is the main factor, it only causes temporary displacement (2011, p. 172).

7 See Case of Osorio Rivera and Family members v. Peru (IACtHR, 2013b)

8 Cf. Case of the Xákmok Kásek Indigenous Community. v. Paraguay (IACtHR, 2010), Case of Luna López v. Honduras (IACtHR, 2013a), and Case of the Pueblo Bello Massacre v. Colombia (IACtHR, 2006a).

9 Naser (2010) considered that in light of the obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill set up under international human rights law, governments have “[…] to adopt legal measures at the local and national levels to coordinate disaster response and relocation management” (p. 114)

10 The pronouncements of the Court about the right to a healthy environment relates to Indigenous Communities issues and their view with respect to the right of property of their lands and natural resources, as reflected in the Cases of Mayagna (Sumo) Awas Tingni v. Nicaragua (IACtHR, 2001), Yakye Axa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay (IACtHR, 2005), and Sawhoyamaxa Indigenous Community v. Paraguay (IACtHR, 2006b).

11 In its recent Advisory Opinion OC 23/17, the IACtHR (2017) highlighted this link, as a result of the interdependence and indivisibility between human rights, the environment, and the sustainable development. The Court quoted the resolution 35/17 of the Human Rights Council to emphasize that climate change produces adverse effects in the rights to life, health, food, water, adequate housing, and self-determination (2017, para. 54).

12 See Case of Kawas Fernández v. Honduras (IACtHR, 2009).

13 Analogously, for Kälin and Schrepfer (2002), “[…] the Non-Refoulement provisions of human rights law may prove particularly significant in this regard” (2002, p. 25).

14 IACtHR (1999). The Right to Information on Consular Assistance in the Framework of the Guarantees of the due Process of Law. Advisory Opinion OC-16/99 of October 1, 1999. Series A No. 16. Para. 114. In this Advisory Opinion the IACtHR (1999) stated that other courts such as the International Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights, in Tyrer v. United Kingdom (1978), Marckx v. Belgium (1979), and Loizidou v. Turkey (1995) have used this criterion.

15 In this regard, the Brazil Declaration in the frame of the Cartagena Declaration, states that “[…] in light of the new challenges posed by climate change and natural disasters, as well as by displacement of persons across borders that these phenomena may generate, UNHCR is requested to prepare a study on the subject with the aim of supporting the adoption of appropriate national and regional measures […], within the framework of its mandate” (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2004, p. 18).



Desarrollado por eScire - Consultoría, Tecnologías y Gestión del Conocimiento SA de CV





INTRODUCCIÓN

Durante las últimas décadas, el cambio climático ha sido uno de los temas de discusión más importantes y controversiales entre los científicos, gobiernos y organizaciones internacionales que han tomado en cuenta las consecuencias potencialmente amenazantes que este fenómeno puede imponer a las formas de vida del planeta. Este tema ha figurado en la agenda de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas desde la primera Conferencia Mundial del Clima en 1979. Fue también incluido en la Agenda 2030 para el Desarrollo Sostenible, cuyo Objetivo 13 nos exhorta a “[…] adoptar medidas urgentes para combatir el cambio climático y sus efectos” (UN General Assembly, 2015, p. 14). A este respecto, la Asamblea General de las Naciones Unidas (UN General Assembly) (2015) han reconocido el cambio de los patrones climáticos, el aumento del nivel de mar y los eventos de clima extremo como consecuencias del cambio climático, siendo circunstancias que afectan a todas las naciones, y particularmente a las poblaciones más pobres y vulnerables.

El primer acuerdo internacional sobre cambio climático fue negociado y firmado recientemente. Este fue resultado de la Conferencia de París sobre el Clima (COP21), organizada por las Naciones Unidas en diciembre del 2015, en la cual 195 países participaron e “[…] implementaron el primer tratado universal y jurídicamente vinculante sobre el clima global” (European Commission, 2016, párr. 4). A este se le ha reconocido como un enorme esfuerzo hacia el reconocimiento de la existencia y los efectos negativos del cambio climático; al momento de firmarse, el acuerdo daba cuenta de muchos problemas, entre los que se cuenta la relación entre cambio climático, migración forzada y derechos humanos. En razón de ello, el Acuerdo de París establece que:

Reconociendo que el cambio climático es un problema de toda la humanidad y que, al adoptar medidas para hacerle frente, las Partes deberían respetar, promover y tener en cuenta sus respectivas obligaciones relativas a los derechos humanos, el derecho a la salud, los derechos de los pueblos indígenas, las comunidades locales, los migrantes, los niños, las personas con discapacidad y las personas en situación vulnerable y el derecho al desarrollo, así como la igualdad de género, el empoderamiento de la mujer y la equidad intergeneracional ( United Nations, 2015, pp. 1-2 ).

No obstante, este reconocimiento es insuficiente, pues el acuerdo carece de profundidad para crear un marco normativo que promueva la defensa de los derechos de aquellos individuos forzados a dejar sus países debido al cambio climático. A raíz de ello, el presente artículo busca analizar los retos que el cambio climático puede representar para los Estados nación en términos de derechos humanos, particularmente para aquellos que se ven en la necesidad de migrar cruzando fronteras. Es así que se estudiará la relación entre el cambio climático y la migración forzada, con el fin de presentar algunos de los problemas que devienen de la responsabilidad internacional de los Estados sobre este tema, y la protección internacional (o su falta de ella), que frente cambio climático puedan brindar a los migrantes documentos como la Convención sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados de 1951, la Declaración de Cartagena de 1984, y la Convención de la Organización para la Unidad Africana (OAU). Finalmente, se analizará el posible incremento potencial incremento de apátridas provocado por la desaparición de Estados nación como consecuencia del cambio climático, y el marco normativo que debiera implementarse con el fin de solucionar efectivamente esta situación.

ESTABLECIENDO LA RELACIÓN ENTRE EL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO Y LA MIGRACIÓN FORZADA

El estudio de la relación entre el cambio climático y la migración forzada ha llevado actualmente a concluir que los impactos del cambio climático, sobre todo aquellos relacionados a la escasez de agua y las condiciones climáticas hostiles, crearán condiciones de vida extremadamente difíciles en algunas partes del mundo (esto tomando en cuenta que provocarán la pérdida de sustento, empleo, tierra, infraestructura, la generación de violencia y conflictos, entre otras), o hará que muchos sitios sean inhabitables, lo que traerá como consecuencia un incremento de la migración forzada (Toscano, 2017).3

De acuerdo con Zetter (2015), los eventos ambientales extremos causarán directa o indirectamente un incremento de migración y desplazamiento humanos, debido a las tres condiciones descritas en el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente (en inglés, UNEP): 1) los efectos del calentamiento, que afectarán la producción agrícola y degradarán el ecosistema, 2) el incremento de eventos de clima extremo (sobre todo lluvias fuertes y sus resultantes inundaciones repentinas o desborde de ríos en regiones tropicales), y 3) el aumento del nivel del mar, lo cual destruirá permanentemente grandes zonas costeras bajas (Zetter, 2015, pp. 3-4).

Más aun, es importante reconocer que muchos académicos consideran que es necesaria mayor labor investigativa para determinar la relación entre cambio climático y migración. Estos han presentado afirmaciones tales como la incertidumbre de los efectos del cambio climático en la migración, la incógnita que existe en torno al número exacto de personas que migrarán debido al cambio climático,4 y las dificultades para diferenciar entre las poblaciones forzadas a migrar por razones de cambio climático de aquellas forzadas a migrar como resultado de factores ambientales o de otro tipo. Además, la multicausalidad ha llevado a que los académicos señalen al cambio climático como solo uno de los factores que exacerban la migración, mayormente de forma temporal y dentro un mismo país (Thornton, 2012, p. 148; Kibreab, 2009, pp. 360, 388).

Debe reconocerse que el cambio climático bien pudiera no ser el único o principal impulsor de la migración, más sí es una fuente de riesgo inminente que debe tomarse en cuenta en cualquier política nacional o internacional diseñada para atender las consecuencias del cambio climático. A este respecto, Toscano (2017) afirmó que el cambio climático es un “multiplicador de amenazas” y que la multicausalidad no quiere decir que el cambio climático no sea un factor importante que induzca a la migración. Es así como a pesar de no haber consenso en cuanto a la razón principal de la migración humana, los efectos del cambio climático (por ejemplo, sequías, inundaciones, pérdida de tierras, alza de temperaturas, y aumento del nivel del mar) forzarán la migración, o harán que poblaciones enteras tengan que soportar sus impactos directos (Toscano, 2017, p. 462; Kuusipalo, 2017, p. 618).

En términos de categorías de migración, el cambio climático producirá desplazados internos (en inglés, IDPs), migrantes del cambio climático, y apátridas. Además, los investigadores han establecido una categoría nueva: “población atrapada”, que consta de personas imposibilitadas para migrar interna o externamente debido a la falta de medios económicos, u otros factores (Black, Arnell, Adger, Thomas y Geddes, 2012; Black y Coyller, 2014; Kuusipalo, 2017). De ello se deriva que el vínculo entre cambio climático y migración es una realidad y que, como lo reportó la Oficina del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos – ACNUDH (2009), trae consigo drásticas consecuencias para con los derechos humanos fundamentales, como el derecho a la vida, a la alimentación, el trabajo, y la vivienda, siendo las más afectadas las poblaciones de países de bajos ingresos.

DESAFÍOS ANTE LOS IMPACTOS DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO EN LA MIGRACIÓN FORZADA

La protección internacional de los migrantes debido al cambio climático enfrenta grandes retos. El primero es la voluntad política de los Estados, en particular de los países desarrollados, de establecer medidas legales y técnicas para prevenir o mitigar las consecuencias del cambio climático en relación con la migración. El segundo es la falta de un marco legal diseñado específicamente para atender los derechos de los migrantes por cambio climático, así como los deberes que tienen para con ellos los Estados nación.

Voluntad política

En este punto, la cuestión es determinar si entre los Estados nación existe una voluntad política de alcanzar un consenso que brinde verdadera y significativa solución a la migración provocada por el cambio climático. La respuesta se ha visto en alguna medida influenciada por el debate aun en curso entre los Estados nación, las Organizaciones de la Sociedad Civil, los académicos y las organizaciones internacionales, en torno a la intensidad de los de efectos del cambio climático, lo cual altera el proceso de toma de decisiones de los Estados nación en cuanto a posibles soluciones. El Grupo Intergubernamental de Expertos sobre el Cambio Climático (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) (2014) ha señalado que “[…] responder a los riesgos relacionados al cambio climático implica tomar decisiones en un mundo cambiante, con una continuada incertidumbre en cuanto a la severidad y el ritmo de los impactos del cambio climático, y con límites sobre la efectividad de la adaptación” (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2014, p. 9). A este respecto, el debate entre académicos consta de aquellos quienes consideran que uno de los impactos del cambio climático es la migración forzada (maximalistas) y aquellos quienes consideran que la migración por consecuencia del cambio climático será solamente “indirecta o multifacética” (minimalistas) (Gogarty, 2011, p. 175; Thornton, 2012, p. 149; Mayer, 2013, p. 3).

Así que mientras efectivamente los Estados nación reconocen el cambio climático como un nuevo factor de migración, la incertidumbre en cuanto al alcance del problema ha evitado que estos lleguen a un consenso sobre las posibles soluciones desde la perspectiva económica y jurídica. De acuerdo con Wyman (2013), son precisamente estos dos aspectos los que representan vacíos en las leyes y políticas sobre la migración por cambio climático. Wyman (2013) los ha descrito como “brecha en derechos” y “déficit de financiación”, donde el primero se refiere a la “falta de una ley vigente que permita residir permanentemente en otro país debido a condiciones ambientales en el país de origen”; el segundo es la “falta de una fuente específica de fondos internacionales para ayudar a compensar los costos en que los países en desarrollo puedan incurrir al lidiar con la migración por cambio climático” (2013, p. 169).

A este respecto, posicionar el tema del cambio climático y la migración forzada al centro de la discusión política definirá el camino que las autoridades responsables deberán seguir para designar métodos mediante los cuales se proporcionará protección económica y jurídica a las poblaciones vulnerables a estas situaciones. Es también necesario considerar a la migración como una estrategia adaptativa:

“[…] en razón de la cual las respuestas políticas a la migración ambiental deberán incluir protección y servicios de apoyo para los migrantes, tales como la inversión en regiones afectadas por el medio ambiente para reducir el flujo de migrantes, la inversión en las regiones destino para ayudar a aligerar el peso que recibir un sustancial número de migrantes pone sobre sus infraestructuras, y el considerar esfuerzos de reasentamiento fundamentado en derechos para las poblaciones directamente desplazadas por los efectos del cambio climático” ( Toscano, 2017, pp. 474-475 ).

Marco legal

Se ha demostrado considerablemente difícil crear un nuevo marco legal para abordar la migración provocada por el cambio climático, en el cual se reconozca una nueva categoría de personas dignas de protección internacional, o bien, encontrar protección jurídica para desplazados ambientales dentro del marco legal internacional para refugiados.

En primera instancia, y como explica Feijen (2012), se requiere de voluntad política para lograr que los Estados nación acuerden el reparto de cargas y concedan el estatus de inmigrante a aquellas personas desplazadas a través de las fronteras debido al cambio climático (2012, pp. 63-64). En segunda instancia, aun cuando algunos comentarios como el de Burleson (2010) han afirmado que realizar enmiendas al marco legal de refugiados ya existente “[…] terminará con el limbo legal que los futuros emigrantes ambientales enfrentarían” (2010, p. 22) la falta de voluntad política es evidente, y esta opción parece menos plausible.5 La estructura actual de protección a los refugiados se encuentra en crisis, y en vez de tener la voluntad de negociar nuevos acuerdos que ofrezcan mayor protección a las poblaciones vulnerables, los gobiernos negocian acuerdos que les permiten evadir principios tan importantes como el principio de no devolución.6 En tercera instancia, la posibilidad legal, e incluso la idoneidad de utilizar el derecho internacional de refugiados para dar protección a los migrantes del cambio climático (también llamados “refugiados del cambio climático”7 por algunos académicos), es altamente controvertida.

En cuanto a esta última cuestión, es importante señalar que bajo las normas internacionales de refugiados, en especial la Convención sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados de 1951 (en adelante la Convención de 1951), y el Protocolo sobre el Estatuto de los Refugiados de 1967 , el concepto de refugiado es muy restrictivo, aún más cuando se toma en cuenta que muchos Estados “tienden a establecer políticas que mantienen a los refugiados fuera de su jurisdicción y, consecuentemente, arriesgan la protección dispuesta por la Convención de 1951” (Llain, 2015, p. 289). De ahí que no incluya personas que necesitan protección internacional más allá de aquellos individuos con un miedo justificado a ser perseguidos por su raza, religión, nacionalidad, pertenencia a un grupo social u opinión política particulares, y quienes por una de estas razones estén fuera de su país de nacionalidad o residencia habitual, y no puedan o deseen valerse de la protección de tal país.

El reporte de la Conferencia de Nansen sobre Cambio Climático y Desplazamiento subraya que “es una preocupación fundamental que mientras que los refugiados de guerra y persecuciones son protegidos por convenciones internacionales, sigue sin ser claro cuáles leyes y políticas protegen a los desplazados que cruzan fronteras internacionales debido a eventos de clima extremo” (Norwegian Refugee Council, 2011, p. 3).

Además, a pesar de que los refugiados del cambio climático tienen un miedo justificado que los lleva a huir de sus países y pueden ser considerados como miembros de un grupo social en particular, (podría argumentarse que comparten como característica común el ser afectados por el cambio climático, esto es, eventos de clima extremo o extremos de otro tipo), autores como McAdam (2011) han afirmado que el concepto proporcionado por la Convención de 1951 no es aplicable a los refugiados del cambio climático en razón de que el cambio climático no puede ser caracterizado como “persecución”. De modo que la persecución es un elemento fundamental para el concepto de refugiado. En este caso no hay un “persecutor” que pueda ser identificado,8 y la persecución debe ser de acuerdo con uno de los cinco motivos dispuestos en la Convención de 1951. McAdam (2011) también expuso que “[…] sería difícil establecer el argumento de que las personas afectadas por sus impactos podrían constituirse en un ‘grupo social particular’, ya que la ley requiere que el grupo debe estar conectado por una característica fundamental e inmutable, aparte del riesgo mismo de persecución” (2011, p. 13).

UN DESAFÍO APARTE: LA APATRIDIA COMO CONSECUENCIA DEL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO

La apatridia se ha convertido en un riesgo inminente derivado del cambio climático, ya que el aumento del nivel del mar podría inundar, en un futuro, a los países de tierras bajas, conocidos como Estados Insulares en Hundimiento (del inglés Sinking Island States; Vidas, 2014). Naciones como Las Maldivas, Kiribati, Tuvalu y las Islas Marshall ya han experimentado ejemplos de esta realidad. En estos Estados, la población ha tenido que dejar sus países como consecuencia del cambio climático, y serán apátridas cuando estos territorios dejen de existir (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2009). Aún cuando algunos autores dudan que esta situación efectivamente llegue a suceder en el corto plazo (Barnett, 2017), la inhabitabilidad de ciertos territorios ya ha comenzado a provocar migración forzada: tómense en cuenta casos como el de las Islas Carteret, en donde 1 000 residentes fueron evacuados a Buganvilla, como consecuencia de la erosión e intrusión de agua salada derivados de tormentas (Brown, 2007).

Este impacto del cambio climático afectará particularmente a pequeñas islas del Pacífico. Así, para el año 2050 de 665 000 a 1.7 millones de personas de las Islas del Pacífico podrían verse forzadas a migrar a otro país. Los estimados indican que Kiribati y Las Maldivas podrían desaparecer completamente en los siguientes 30 a 60 años; igualmente Tuvalu podría desaparecer en el transcurso de los siguientes 50 años (Tomkiw, 2015).

También es posible afirmar que las consecuencias del cambio climático, y particularmente aquellas relacionadas con el incremento del nivel del mar, podrían comenzar antes de lo esperado, ya que los territorios podrían tornarse inhóspitos previo a su extinción. Algunos Estados ya han sido afectos por impactos del cambio climático, tales como inundaciones temporales, tormentas tropicales, marejadas, y erosión costera, todos estos fenómenos con la capacidad para destruir el territorio de un Estado. Por ejemplo, periódicamente Tuvalu se ve afectado por inundaciones que provocan contaminación y la destrucción de hogares. Asimismo, en 2004 y como resultado de un tsunami, Las Maldivas se sumergieron casi por completo. Desde entonces, las mareas han inundado 80 de las islas a su alrededor (Park y UNHCR, 2011).

Cambio climático y Estado

Como ya hemos explicado, la apatridia tiene probabilidad de incrementarse como consecuencia de la desaparición de ciertos Estados. Bajo Derecho Internacional Consuetudinario, un Estado es considerado como tal cuando tiene: 1) un territorio definido, 2) una población permanente, 3) un gobierno, 4) la capacidad de establecer relaciones con otros Estados. Este concepto ha sido establecido en tratados internacionales tales como la Convención sobre los Derechos y Deberes de los Estados de Montevideo de 1933.

De acuerdo con estos términos, el territorio es un elemento clave para el concepto de Estado. Bajo el Derecho Internacional, una entidad no puede reclamar la categoría de Estado si carece de un territorio (Crawford, 1977; Zounuzy, 2012). Más aún, debe tomarse en cuenta que sin un territorio no es posible cumplir con los otros elementos del concepto de Estado, particularmente debido a la relación entre el territorio y la población permanente, ya que los habitantes comparten un vínculo íntimo con el territorio en el que viven. Esto no quiere decir que la totalidad de la población debe vivir en el territorio nacional; tomando en cuenta que los criterios de la Convención son independientes, cuando menos una porción de la población debe vivir en el territorio, y por eso existe un nexo implícito entre el territorio del Estado y su población permanente (Jan, 2011).

El caso de los Estados Insulares en Hundimiento es único en este sentido, por la falta de Estados sucesores que reemplacen a los precedentes. Aun cuando el Derecho Internacional aplica la presunción de continuidad, no se cuentan con precedentes a la pérdida del territorio completo de un Estado o de la migración de una población en su totalidad (McAdam, 2010), lo cual genera una apatridia de jure para los individuos implicados, al no poder llegar a ser ciudadanos de otros Estados de acuerdo con las leyes de los Estados receptores (Park y UNHCR, 2011).

El Derecho Internacional no ha desarrollado ningún precedente útil en caso de la desaparición de Estados; únicamente ha regulado casos de: “(1) absorción (por parte de otro Estado), fusión (con otro Estado), y disolución (con posterior emergencia de un Estado sucesor)” (McAdam, 2010, p. 2), y la diferencia entre estos casos y la extinción de un Estado por motivos de cambio climático reside en que “[…] el territorio abandonado no será (no podrá) ser tomado por otro Estado” (McAdam, 2010, p. 2). En este sentido, el principio de presunción de continuidad de existencia como Estado no puede obviar que el territorio se vuelva inhabitable, siendo la habitabilidad una condición necesaria para la categoría de Estado. Si la población de un Estado nación con territorio inhabitable o desaparecido no cuenta con otra nacionalidad, serán apátridas de jure, además de que las dificultades de la apatridia no conciernen solamente al derecho a la nacionalidad, sino también a otros derechos que dependen del reconocimiento del individuo como ciudadano de un Estado específico (Alexander y Simon, 2014).

Por otro lado, con respecto a los derechos humanos, el Derecho Internacional establece como una obligación el deber de readmisión de las personas en situación de apatridia. El deber de readmisión tiene que ver con la posibilidad de los Estados nación de readmitir a sus propios ciudadanos como un requerimiento mínimo para la prevención de la apatridia. Tomando en cuenta este deber, no sería posible que los Estados con territorio inhabitable o desaparecido readmitieran a los ciudadanos que han sufrido debido a las consecuencias de los impactos del cambio climático (Alexander y Simon, 2017).

POSIBLES SOLUCIONES FRENTE A LA MIGRACIÓN DEBIDO AL CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO

Exploración de oportunidades de protección dentro del marco del Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos

Los Estados nación han concentrado sus esfuerzos en la creación de planes de prevención, mitigación y adaptación para lidiar con el cambio climático y sus impactos adversos. Además, se ha dispuesto la cooperación internacional en términos de proporcionar fondos para tales planes y proyectos en países menos desarrollados. Sin embargo, la cuestión principal, relativa a las vidas humanas, es cómo proporcionar protección jurídica a las poblaciones afectadas por el cambio climático con el fin de garantizar sus derechos humanos fundamentales.

Dentro de este contexto, proporcionar protección jurídica no quiere decir solamente establecer políticas que aseguren la asistencia económica, logística y técnica para la adaptación e incluso reubicación, sino también el interpretar las políticas migratorias de acuerdo con las obligaciones internacionales en razón de los derechos humanos para así facilitar el ejercicio de los derechos de los migrantes del cambio climático. Por ello es importante explorar oportunidades de protección dentro del marco legal de los derechos humanos, lo que no necesitará voluntad política para realizar enmiendas, ni la creación de nuevas normativas, y que podrá ser implementado mediante los sistemas regionales de derechos humanos.

A la par con esta idea, Chapman (2010) afirmó que los sistemas regionales (europeos, interamericanos y africanos) cuentan con el potencial de ser utilizados para abordar situaciones relacionadas con cambio climático, pues “[…] al evaluar el potencial resultado de una petición basada en violaciones a los derechos humanos provocadas por el cambio climático, cada uno de los tres sistemas establecidos presenta sus propias ventajas” (2010, p. 37).

Por ejemplo, dentro del Sistema Interamericano de Derechos Humanos, el deber general de prevención está propiamente desarrollado en la doctrina y jurisprudencia tanto de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CIDH) como de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Corte IDH). La Corte IDH ha dictaminado que los Estados que forman parte de la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos, tienen la obligación de dar los pasos razonables para la prevención de la violación a los derechos humanos.9 Esto quiere decir que en una situación de riesgo real, factual e inmediata de violación de los derechos humanos, sabida por el Estado y sus autoridades, el Estado deberá tomar todas las medidas necesarias y razonables de naturaleza legal, política, administrativa y cultural para prevenir y evitar tal riesgo.10

Aplicado este razonamiento, el cambio climático puede ser considerado como un riesgo genuino, presente e inmediato para los derechos humanos de los individuos forzados a abandonar sus lugares de origen por motivo de este factor, siendo a su vez un riesgo conocido por los Estados nación. Por lo tanto, estos tienen la responsabilidad de tomar acciones para prevenir los impactos del cambio climático (Naciones Unidas, 2015) en términos de migración forzada, aplicando la normatividad jurídica, así como otros tipos de acciones para asistir a los afectados en la preservación de sus derechos.11

Además, tratados regionales tales como el Protocolo Adicional a la Convención Americana sobre Derechos Humanos en materia de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales “Protocolo de San Salvador” en su artículo 11, donde reconoce el derecho a un medioambiente saludable, mismo que ha sido también utilizado como la base para peticiones ante la Comisión Africana de Derechos Humanos y de los Pueblos (CADHP), una entidad que ha identificado Estados que transgreden sus obligaciones asociadas (Chapman, 2010).

En el Sistema Interamericano, y aunque son pocos los casos,12 la Corte IDH ha identificado una relación innegable entre la protección del medio ambiente y el disfrute de otros derechos humanos.13 También, la Corte IDH (2009) ha afirmado que “la forma en que la degradación ambiental y los efectos adversos del cambio climático han afectado el goce efectivo de los derechos humanos en el continente ha sido objeto de discusión de la Asamblea General de la Organización de los Estados Americanos y las Naciones Unidas”14 (párr. 148).

Más aún, como lo explicó la Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente (2008), el reconocimiento de este derecho humano implica que los Estados deben poner a disponibilidad recursos y tomar acciones para garantizarlo. Además de lo ya descrito, cabe enfatizar que en el Sistema Interamericano de Derechos Humanos el derecho a un medio ambiente saludable tiene una connotación que trasciende el derecho humano, pues la Carta Democrática Interamericana también lo reconoce como un objetivo de la democracia en su artículo 15 (Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente, 2008).

Por ello, el diseño y la implementación de leyes y políticas, así como el discurso político, deberán estar guiados por un enfoque fundamentado en los derechos humanos. De acuerdo con Aminzadeh (2007), tal enfoque “[…] integraría los enfoques teóricos y de litigio del derecho ambiental y derechos humanos” (2007, p. 258). En este sentido, estrategias tales como “[…] 1) la aplicación de derechos procesales encontrados en el Derecho Internacional de Derechos Humanos al litigio en materia de cambio climático; 2) el reconocimiento de un derecho inequívoco al bienestar medioambiental; y 3) la reinterpretación de los derechos humanos ya existentes dentro del contexto medioambiental” pueden ser viables para proporcionar una solución efectiva para la ya mencionada protección de los migrantes del cambio climático (Aminzadeh, 2007, p. 245).

Interpretación evolutiva del principio de no devolución

Como ya se ha explicado, el marco legal internacional actual en materia de refugiados es demasiado estrecho para poder incluir a los migrantes del cambio climático. En este escenario, la solución más eficaz consiste en dar al principio de no devolución una interpretación evolutiva, para así ensanchar el campo de acción de las protecciones que ofrece, de tal manera que abarque a los migrantes del cambio climático.15 A este respecto cabe señalar que para fines de la interpretación de los tratados de derecho internacional en materia de derechos humanos, debería hacerse lo mismo con el principio pro homine “[…] esto es, que debería reinterpretarse de manera que brinde mayor protección a los derechos humanos” (Lixinski, 2010, p. 588).

Es así como una interpretación evolutiva del principio de no devolución, basada en el concepto de respeto a la dignidad humana, podría llevar al establecimiento de la responsabilidad internacional de los Estados en cuanto a este tema, creando un curso de acción que los migrantes del cambio climático puedan seguir cuando se les niegue la protección. En cuanto a este tema, la CIDH ha afirmado que el respeto a la dignidad inherente del individuo es el principio sobre el cual se basan las protecciones fundamentales del derecho a la vida y a la preservación del bienestar físico. Las condiciones de grave contaminación ambiental, mismas que pueden causar serias complicaciones de salud, discapacidad y sufrimiento a las poblaciones locales, son incompatibles con el derecho a ser respetado como ser humano (Asociación Americana para la Defensa del Ambiente, 2008, p. 54).

Acorde a esto, la interpretación evolutiva de los derechos consagrada en los tratados internacionales en materia de derechos humanos deberá jugar un rol importante en ampliar el alcance del principio de no devolución. Las instituciones internacionales de derechos humanos tales como el Corte IDH (1999) se han valido de esta forma de interpretación, explicando que “[…] los tratados de derechos humanos son instrumentos vivos, cuya interpretación deberá tomar en cuenta la evolución de los tiempos y las condiciones de vida actuales”16 (1999, párr. 114).

Como consecuencia de esto, al considerar la protección que puede proporcionarse a los migrantes del cambio climático, los instrumentos internacionales aplicables deberán vincularse a las circunstancias del caso; los Estados saben que el cambio climático es un riesgo real e inminente, como ya hemos descrito, y que estas circunstancias son causa de múltiples violaciones a los derechos humanos. De acuerdo con Naser (2010), los migrantes en esta situación se ven específicamente afectados en su derecho a la vida, la salud, la comida, y la vivienda adecuada. Es por esto que se insiste cada vez más en que un “marco de políticas deberá desarrollarse, para proteger, respetar, y promover los derechos humanos de los afectados” (2010, p. 119).

Sobre este tema, McAdam (2011) ha afirmado que la mejor forma de aplicar el principio de no devolución frente al cambio climático es conectándolo con al derecho a la vida y al derecho a no verse sujeto a tortura o a tratos o castigos inhumanos o degradantes, ya que estos derechos “[…] son claramente reconocidos en el Derecho Internacional como fundamentos de tal obligación, mismos que han sido incorporados a varios regímenes nacionales de protección complementaria” (2011, p. 18). Como resultado, los Estados tendrán el deber general de proteger y de no retornar o expulsar a las poblaciones vulnerables a sitios en los que sus vidas estén en riesgo de perjuicio debido a los efectos del cambio climático.

Finalmente, los cambios con el transcurrir del tiempo y las condiciones contemporáneas han sido causa para instar con urgencia la expansión del concepto de refugiado. Por ejemplo, el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados ha exhortado a los Estados para que estos implementen definiciones más amplias de refugiado, tales como las adoptadas en la Declaración de Cartagena o la Convención de la OUA por la que se regulan los Aspectos Específicos de Problemas de los Refugiados en África (Llain, 2015, p. 290). Bajo estos tratados, la protección internacional disponible para los refugiados podrá verse ulteriormente impulsada por razones como agresiones externas, ocupación, dominio extranjero, o eventos que afecten seriamente el orden público ya sea en parte del país de origen o en su totalidad, y la violación masiva de los derechos humanos (agregada por la Declaración de Cartagena). Sigue siendo una tarea no finalizada el analizar si factores tales como “eventos que afecten seriamente el orden público” pudieran interpretarse a favor de otorgar protección internacional bajo estatus de refugiado a aquellos que padezcan de los efectos adversos del cambio climático.17 No obstante, Warren (2016) ha señalado que “de acuerdo con cualquiera de las definiciones más amplias, podría argumentarse que un desastre natural se constituye efectivamente en una circunstancia que 'afecta el orden público', más ninguna fue explícitamente concebida para abarcar el desplazamiento ambiental” (2016, p. 2123). Por ello es que nuevamente es momento de hacer un llamado en pro de una interpretación más amplia que pueda incluir, a nivel de derecho tanto municipal como internacional, disposiciones que conciernan al estatus de los migrantes del cambio climático.

Protección complementaria, soluciones duraderas: repatriación voluntaria, reasentamiento e integración

El principio de no devolución establece una obligación adicional que podría ser una solución para los migrantes del cambio climático, tomando en cuenta los tratados universales sobre los refugiados y el derecho internacional consuetudinario en materia de refugiados. La protección complementaria se refiere al mecanismo para conceder protección internacional a personas que no cumplan con los requisitos establecidos para ser consideradas como refugiados dentro del ámbito de la Convención de 1951 (Mandal, 2005).

Esta obligación se fundamenta en las disposiciones que prohíben la expulsión de individuos del territorio de un Estado nación, y la responsabilidad internacional de un Estado en cuanto a actos u omisiones cuando individuos necesiten protección internacional al peligrar sus derechos humanos (Mandal, 2005).

En este sentido, los Estados nación deberán desarrollar sistemas de protección complementaria que tengan por finalidad el aplicar las obligaciones de derecho internacional y evitar la violación de los derechos humanos de aquellos impactados por el cambio climático. Aun cuando la protección complementaria podría requerir ulterior desarrollo para atender propiamente los retos del cambio climático, no impide que el cambio climático sea reconocido como una fuente de trato inhumano, lo que obliga a los Estados el conceder protección (McAdam, 2011).

Puesto en las palabras de la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Inter- American Commission on Human Rights) (2015):

Las medidas de protección complementaria permiten regularizar la permanencia de personas que no son reconocidas como refugiadas pero cuyo retorno sería contrario a obligaciones generales sobre la no devolución, contenidas en diferentes instrumentos de derechos humanos ( Inter- American Commission on Human Rights, 2015, párr. 133 ).

Además, las soluciones duraderas para los refugiados que podrían aplicarse para abordar correctamente la migración forzada, la repatriación voluntaria, la integración local, y el reasentamiento, son medidas que pueden igualmente ayudar a mitigar los impactos del cambio climático sobre la migración. Los Estados nación deben poner en operación soluciones para los migrantes del cambio climático, que se fundamenten en las necesidades de protección internacional, tomándose en cuenta:

  • Emprender actividades que faciliten la repatriación voluntaria y la reintegración sostenible, cooperando con socios relevantes, así como llevar a cabo supervisión posterior al regreso.

  • Explorar opciones de integración local para ciertos grupos, tales como la residencia permanente y la naturalización.

  • Explorar opciones y tasas de reasentamiento para grupos específicos, valiéndose estratégicamente del reasentamiento y coordinando las necesidades de este con miras de adoptar un enfoque de alcance regional (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2007, p. 187).

Medidas preventivas para casos de apatridia

Como se ha mencionado anteriormente, la apatridia como consecuencia del cambio climático será difícil de abordar si se toma en cuenta la falta de normatividad y la naturaleza muy reciente de la nueva situación de apatridia. Es por esto que es muy importante tomar medidas preventivas que impliquen: 1) la reducción del impacto del cambio climático, y 2) la preparación para el momento en que varios Estados se tornen inhabitables. El hecho de que el cambio climático sea una realidad no puede ignorarse, y el derecho internacional debe estar preparado, de acuerdo con la normativa ya existente sobre leyes internacionales en materia de derechos humanos. En este sentido, “la severidad de los retos dependería del avance del aumento del nivel del mar. Inicialmente, las consecuencias drásticas afectarían solamente algunos estados de tierras bajas, en particular muchos Estados insulares del océano Pacífico e Índico” (Vidas, 2014, p. 73).

Consecuentemente, la normativa internacional para apátridas por cambio climático debería basarse en la importancia de contar con una nacionalidad, con el propósito de crear un sistema especial de protección en los Estados receptores, proveyendo obligaciones y derechos que permitan al apátrida conservar su vida y adaptarse en el Estado que lo ha recibido.

Además, no basta reconocer el estatus de apátrida para garantizar la protección de los derechos humanos de personas forzadas a migrar por consecuencia de la inhabitabilidad o desaparición del territorio de su Estado; el reconocimiento debería ser más bien un punto de partida para el desarrollo de medidas legales que aborden este reto.

CONCLUSIONES

Los impactos del cambio climático han comenzado a manifestarse antes de lo que el mundo esperaba; “[…] el cambio climático avanza sin menguar, existe un creciente número de hombres, mujeres y niños desplazados cuyos hogares han sido vueltos inhabitables debido a un amplio espectro de desastres ambientales” (Lam, 2012, párr. 1). Tal espectro incluye daño a asentamientos e infraestructura, alteración de ecosistemas, disrupción de suministros de agua y producción alimenticia, mortalidad, incidencia de enfermedades y deterioro de la salud, todo esto como resultado de inundaciones, incendios forestales, ciclones, olas de calor y sequías provocadas por el cambio climático (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2014, p. 6), mismas que han tenido un impacto la sociedad humana.

El número de los afectados ambientales y futuros apátridas en el mundo ha comenzado a crecer y continuará así. Los nativos de Alaska y los Estados insulares de tierras bajas en Oceanía, son las primeras comunidades que enfrentan el cambio climático debido a su ubicación geográfica y a sus medios tradicionales de sustento, que las vuelve vulnerables a las dificultades de un mundo con temperaturas al alza (Mellino, 2016, párr. 3).

Se estima que en el futuro habrá “[…] de 25 millones a 1 billón de migrantes ambientales para el año 2050, movilizándose ya sea dentro de sus países o cruzando fronteras, de forma permanente o temporal, siendo 200 millones el estimado citado más a menudo” (International Organization for Migration, s.f., párr. 15). Además, y tomando en cuenta el estimado de 200 millones de refugiados ambientales para el año 250, este número:

[…] representa un incremento de casi cuatro veces el número de desplazados y refugiados actualmente elegibles para recibir protección bajo el mandato del ACNUR. También, en el 2007, el IPCC sugirió que más de 600 millones de personas actualmente viviendo en zonas costeras bajas (438 millones en Asia y 246 millones en países menos desarrollados) se verán directamente en riesgo de amenazas potenciales por cambio climático durante este siglo. Los apodados ‘hotspots climáticos’ (islas de tierras bajas, regiones costeras, grandes deltas de ríos y regiones subdesarrolladas) siguen corriendo el riesgo de sufrir catastróficos cambios en su medio ambiente. Bajo el actual Derecho Internacional, cualquier migración transfronteriza desde estas áreas, inducida por cambio climático desencadenaría mínima protección o mecanismo de asistencia que pudiera proporcionarles ayuda ( Glahn, 2009, párr. 13 ).

Entendiendo lo anterior, es posible afirmar que la principal causa de apatridia es no solamente el aumento del nivel del mar, sino también los desastres ambientales, la falta de recursos naturales y los problemas de producción alimenticia y suministro de agua.

Los impactos del cambio climático son reales y no pueden ignorarse. Millones se verán desplazados internamente, o tendrán que abandonar sus países por causas del cambio climático. Además, poblaciones completas podrían verse forzadas a movilizarse a otros países, ya que la desaparición de sus Estados parece inevitable. No obstante, la cuestión relevante es evitar esta catástrofe mediante la implementación de medidas legislativas tanto a nivel de derecho interno como internacional, proporcionando así protección legal adecuada de acuerdo con las normas actuales y futuras en materia de derechos humanos.

Notas

2 De acuerdo con Toscano (2017), la migración forzada interna y la que cruzan fronteras “serán cada vez más comunes debido a las repercusiones del cambio climático” (2017, p. 140).

3 A pesar de las distintas estimaciones realizadas por varios académicos como Meyers (1997), Stern (2007), Aid (2007), y ACNUR (2012), la complejidad del cambio climático hace muy difícil determinar un número exacto de personas desplazadas por razones ambientales (Fujibayashi y Nakayama, 2017, p. 1; Toscano, 2017, p. 474).

4 De acuerdo con Thornton (2012) “una nueva generación de estudio académico en materia jurídica y de políticas ha cuestionado la posibilidad o utilidad de realizar nuevos tratados o revisar los ya existentes, y con ello el enfoque basado en protección” (2012, p. 154). De modo similar,Warren (2016) ha expresado que algunos comentadores temen que el realizar enmiendas a la Convención disminuirá la actual protección a refugiados (2016, p. 2125).

5 El ejemplo más reciente de esta situación es el acuerdo entre la Unión Europea y Turquía sobre refugiados que le permite a Grecia regresar “migrantes irregulares” a Turquía. Según lo informado por Rankin (2016), el Consejo de Europa ha condenado el acuerdo alegando que “[...] excede los límites de lo que está permitido bajo el derecho internacional” (párr. 1).

6 Este término, así como “refugiados ambientales”, se utiliza normalmente para referirse a “[…] personas que se han visto forzadas a dejar su hábitat tradicional, temporal o permanentemente, debido a una severa disrupción medioambiental que ha puesto su existencia en peligro, y/o a afectado seriamente su calidad de vida” (Essam El-Hinnawi, 1985, p. 4. Citado por Bates, 2002, p. 466).

7 Véase también Wyman (2013), quien considera que el cambio climático no es una forma de persecución (p. 179). Igualmente, a Gogarty (2011), quen ha explicado que abogar por el reconocimiento de los migrantes del cambio climático dentro del marco de la Convención de 1951 ha sido inútil debido a que los críticos no consideran al cambio climático como el principal factor del desplazamiento, y que cuando efectivamente es el factor principal, este únicamente provoca desplazamientos temporales (2011, p. 172).

8 Ver Caso de Osorio Rivera y familiares vs. Perú (Corte IDH, 2013b).

9 Compárese con Caso de la Comunidad Indígena Xákmok Kásek vs. Paraguay (Corte IDH, 2010, el Caso de Luna López vs. Honduras (Corte IDH, 2013a) y Caso de la Masacre de Pueblo Bello vs. Colombia (Corte IDH, 2006a).

10 Naser (2010) considera que en razón de las obligaciones de respetar, proteger y cumplir dispuestas en el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos, los gobiernos deben “[…] adoptar medidas legales a nivel local y nacional para coordinar la respuesta a desastres y la gestión de reubicaciones” (2010, p. 114).

11 Los dictámenes de la Corte IDH en cuanto al derecho a un medio ambiente saludable se relacionan a problemas de Comunidades Indígenas y a su perspectiva con respecto al derecho de propiedad sobre sus tierras y recursos naturales, como se puede ver en los casos de Mayagna (Sumo) Awas Tingni vs. Nicaragua (Corte IDH, 2001), Comunidad Indígena Yakye Axa vs. Paraguay Corte IDH, 2005), y Comunidad Indígena Sawhoyamaxa vs. Paraguay (Corte IDH, 2006b).

12 En su reciente Opinión Consultiva OC 23/17, la Corte IDH (2017) subrayó este vínculo como resultado de la interdependencia e indivisibilidad entre derechos humanos, el medio ambiente, y el desarrollo sostenible. La Corte IDH (2017) citó la resolución 35/17 del Consejo de Derechos Humanos para enfatizar que el cambio climático produce efectos adversos para el derecho a la vida, la salud, la comida, el agua, la vivienda adecuada y la auto determinación (2017, párr. 54).

13 Ver Caso de Kawas Fernández vs. Honduras (Corte IDH, 2009).

14 De forma análoga, Kälin y Schrepfer (2002) afirmaron que “[…] las disposiciones de No Devolución en materia de los derechos humanos pueden ser particularmente significativa a este respecto” (2002, p. 25).

15 Corte IDH (1999). El derecho a la información sobre la asistencia consular en el marco de las garantías del debido proceso legal. Opinión Consultiva OC-16/99 de 1 de octubre de 1999. Serie A No. 16, párr. 114. En esta Opinión Consultiva, la Corte IDH (1999) afirmó que los otros tribunales tales como la Corte Internacional de Justicia y el Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos, en Tyrer vs. Reino Unido (1978), Marckx vs. Bélgica (1979), y Loizdou vs. Turquía (1995), se han valido de este criterio.

16 A este respecto, la Declaración de Brasil, en el marco de la Declaración de Cartagena, afirma que “[…] a la luz de los nuevos desafíos planteados por el cambio climático y los desastres naturales, así como por el desplazamiento de personas a través de las fronteras que estos fenómenos pudieran generar, se solicita al ACNUR realizar un estudio sobre el tema con miras a apoyar la adopción de medidas nacionales y regionales apropiadas […], en el marco de su competencia” (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2014, p. 18).

EL COLEGIO DE LA FRONTERA NORTE
Todos los contenidos publicados en esta revista se encuentran bajo la licencia Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-SinDerivar 4.0 Internacional.
Licencia de Creative Commons