Galindo: Words matter: Representation of Mexican immigrants in newspapers from Mexico and the United States



Immigration is a persevering topic worldwide. Millions of people move from their place of origin to another location in the world looking for, what they hope, is a better life. This constant worldwide migration has been part of humanity since its inception. Today people have many reasons to emigrate and these can go from economic reasons and reunification with family members, to perspectives of better job opportunities or running away from violence.

With the arrival of people to a new nation something else emerges: the representation and perception of immigrants by the media. If we reexamine the United States history we will find many examples of how the representation of foreigners by the media had contributed by ultimately fed people’s stereotypes about the newcomers. The Irish, Jews, Japanese, and Mexicans are just some of the groups of immigrants that have face negative representation in media through United States history.

Mexicans more than any other immigrants face very particular experiences for reasons such as geographical proximity of both nations or the common history and territory they once shared that makes the relationship between Mexico and the United States still pretty much dynamic ( Delgado & Marquez, 2007 ). However, the relationship between the two nations has never been completely beneficial for the immigrants who, for more than a century, have crossed the border to the north and had all sorts of nasty experiences fueled in part on how they are perceived. One of the main representations of the Mexican immigrant is based on the perception of their illegality. The idea that all Mexicans are illegals and therefore criminals is a discourse still used in our days by politicians as recently as during the 2016 presidential campaign. For DeGenova (2013) all the major changes on immigration law made by the United States since 1965 had contributed to restrict the legal migration of Mexicans and to the rationalization of Mexicans as invaders who violate the law of the land. The imagery and representation of Mexicans has not changed, and the way in which Mexican immigrants are represented by the media contributes much to the construction of stereotypes about them. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the media, both in Mexico and in the United States, represent immigrants from Mexico, and how their word choices potentially can help reinforce stereotypes about them. In the following pages, I analyzed the resulting data in order to obtain a better perspective on how immigrants are represented in the media through the type of words and their constant use in news articles, both in English and Spanish, as well as the context they were used and presented to the reader.

The Power of Language

Language is powerful and, depending on how it is used, its meaning can have a good or bad effect. For Fairclough (1995) language use is related with people social identities, their social relations and their system of knowledge and beliefs. This last aspect of language use is influenced by the media, and can be correlated with what people know through the media and how that knowledge interacts with their beliefs.

When the message in the media is transmitted, not only is important to analyze the text, but also how the text can influence the reader to believe in something that transcends the meaning of words. Van Dijk (2007) articulates that almost all levels of contexts, including both written and verbal communication, can be controlled by powerful speakers who, in many cases, abuse their power without caring about the consequences. In this sense, the media is undoubtedly one of the most important channels used to control people’s thoughts. Hanson (2008) explains that media has an attitudinal effect over people that can create ideas or feelings about products or individuals based on media content. Media plays an important role in the development of ideas, trends, and beliefs; and has the potential to influence the development of stereotypical ideas about non-dominant ethnic groups. According to Rodríguez & Mena (2008) Media is in a privileged position, since the way in which their members frame information can provoke a distorted and stereotypical outlook. For Davis (1985) news discourse is pre-structured by the news selection processes and the agenda behind those in charge of the selection of what is going to be published or not. Even with the proliferation of the Internet as a mass distributor of media content in later decades, as Metzger (2009) states not everything has change about media effects over the audience. What the author explains is that many of the content distributed through the Internet continues to be mostly based on traditional sources such as online versions of traditional newspapers. Riffe, Lacy, and Fico (2005) explain that in the last three decades research suggest that the effects of mass media depends on various factors and conditions such as the audience level of education and both socio cultural and socioeconomic status. According to Hanson (2008) it’s very difficult to distinguish what information is informative and which one is persuasive. Research on the effect of media over audiences have been evolving alongside media, however, it’s still difficult for many stipulate clearly quantify the influence of media in public opinion.

Van Dijk (2007) explains that typically immigrants and minorities are viewed as the other and that immigrant’s representation is often limited “to three categories: they are different, they are perverse, and they are a threat” (p.11). For Galan (2006) , immigrants commonly appear in the media in a context of aberration or illegality, and other situations unfavorable to their image. All of these circumstances have the potential to influence people’s perceptions of reality. The way that mass media inform the community about issues related to immigration can influence public opinion and the way people think about immigrants and issues related to immigration ( Cheng et al., 2009 ). For Fairclough (1995) , media discourse influences how people use language, providing models similar to real-life situations and, at the same time, reshaping them. Discourse, and specifically critical discourse analysis, is related to language and is defined by van Dijk (2003) as “a type of discourse analytical research that primarily studies the way social power abuse, dominance, an inequality are enacted, reproduced, and resisted by text and talk in the social and political context” (p. 352). Richardson (2007) explains that critical discourse analysis aims to investigate the relation between “the text, and its social conditions, ideologies, and power-relations” (p. 27).

Methodology

The theoretical framework of the present paper has been based on Fairclough (2009) dialectical-relational version of critical discourse analysis and describes the four steps necessary to achieve a critical discourse analysis: (1) Focus upon a social wrong in its semiotic aspect; for this research the social wrong is the SB1070; (2) Identify obstacles in order to address the social wrong. For this research, I identified the language/words used before and after the SB1070 was authorized and enacted in 2010; (3) Considers whether the social order “needs” the social wrong. For this research, I analyzed how many times the words were used in each newspaper. (4) Identify ways to surmount the obstacles. This perspective of critical discourse analysis is more closely related to the relationship between language and society. I also included as part of the theoretical framework the concept of critical discourse analysis as proposed by van Dijk (1993) “the relationship between text, talk, social cognition, power, society and culture” (p.253), is important. Based on van Dijk’s (1993) concept of critical discourse analysis, I examined how text in the media is presented in both Mexico and the United States. More specifically, I researched the common use of language in reference to immigrants within four newspapers; the power of negative discourse used in newspapers; how newspapers from Mexico and the United States perceive immigrants, judged according to the type of news articles analyzed; how such language reflects the culture of immigration in both countries; and how Mexican immigrants to the United States are seen in both nations.

Newspapers online versions

This research focuses on news articles about immigration issues published in online versions of printed newspapers in Mexico and the United States, as well as the most used words employed. For the purpose of this research, news articles included publications online that inform the public of an event, but not analysis of the event (e.g., editorials, columns, or reviews). Thus, once the analysis of words had been conducted, the raw information was cleansed of numbers, prepositions, conjunctions and pronouns in order to concentrate on those words used to represent immigrants.

This research analyzes the online version of El Diario NTR, one of the most important newspapers in Zacatecas, Mexico, the state from which in 2010 most immigrants from Mexico immigrate to the United States. Tuiran (2002) specifies that Zacatecas produced the most Mexicans immigrants to the United States. The author asserts that “one in three people born in Zacatecas live in the neighboring country to the north” (p. 80). Between 2008 and 2013 Zacatecas was the state that lost more population to migration to the United States, based on numbers provided by the Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (Inegi) ( Ollaquindia, 2015 ). By 2015 Zacatecas was displaced to a second place by Michoacán as the state with more migration to the United States. According to Inegi’s press bulletin #41 115.8 people out of 10,000 habitants from Zacatecas migrated to the United States, meanwhile from Michoacán the numbers were 136.1 out of 10,000 ( Inegi, 2017 ).

In order to gain the regional perspective of the United States, I have also used the Los Angeles Times, one of the most important newspapers in Los Angeles, California, a city with the largest number of Mexican immigrants from Zacatecas. Los Angeles is home to 3,510,677 Mexicans ( US Census Bureau, 2010 ), the second-largest Mexican population in the world after that of Mexico City.

During the selection of newspapers, the primary aspect taken into consideration was their presence in their respective markets. The newspapers were selected according to page views, circulations, and ranges. The political inclination of the newspapers was not considered, since that aspect was not part of the research conducted. However, is pertinent to disclosure that at least Los Angeles Times and The New York Times are considered liberal media for some and more liberal centrist for others. Although, for many Los Angeles Times lean also more towards the conservative side. As mentioned by van Dijk (1991) “what for one reader or journalist is a conservative newspaper may be more or less liberal paper to another reader, or in another country, or vice versa” (p.9).

The purpose of choosing El Diario NTR, and the Los Angeles Times was to analyze media perspectives in the state from which the majority of Mexicans emigrated in 2010 as well as in the city many of these immigrants called home.

To obtain the perspective of the national media regarding immigration issues, the online versions of newspapers based in Mexico City and New York City were selected. El Universal was selected as Mexico’s national newspaper. For the United States, The New York Times was selected as the source of news articles about immigration issues from a national perspective. After USA Today and The Wall Street Journal, the paper is the third largest in circulation nationwide. The New York Times was founded on September 18, 1851, and in 2012 had a daily circulation of 916,911 copies (New York Times, 2011). In order to perform the necessary search for articles in the Los Angeles Times, El Universal, and The New York Time online editions, I needed to use a word that formed the core of this research. That word was immigrants in the two English language newspapers, and inmigrantes in the two Spanish language newspapers. The timeline selected for the search was from October 13, 2009, to October 12, 2010. This timeline was selected based on the Arizona’s law SB1070, a piece of legislation surrounded by controversy. According to Diaz (2011) SB1070 makes it a state crime to be an undocumented person living in Arizona. In order to obtain a more in-depth perspective about the negative media discourse about immigrants, specifically Mexican immigrants, the timeline (see Figure 1 ) ranges from six months before the bill passed in the Arizona House of Representatives (April 13, 2010) to three months and 14 days after the date on which the law was supposed to be enforced (July 29, 2010).

Figura 1.

Cronología en la que se basó la investigación

1665-8906-migra-v10-e2024-f1.png

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de investigaciones de campo.

According to Fairclough (2009) , the first stage of a critical discourse analysis should focus on what he defines as a social wrong. For the author, social wrongs are “aspects of social systems, forms or orders which are detrimental to human well-being” (p.167). A law such as SB 1070 can be considered a social system that is prejudicial to the well-being of immigrants, specifically those from Mexico.

Data

The preliminary online search resulted in 1,718 articles from The New York Times, 195 from The Los Angeles Times, 186 from El Universal, and 415 from El Diario NTR the data was cleansed from any type of articles (e.g., books, films, and food) that included the author’s opinion. After this process, the final number of articles from each online newspaper was as follows: 173 from The New York Times, 20 from the Los Angeles Times, 174 from El Universal, and 415 from El Diario NTR. The number of articles from El Diario NTR did not change, because the search for articles in the online newspaper was made article by article. The data cleaning process took a great deal of time because of the large number of articles. For the purpose of this research, all articles not related to Mexican immigration were disregarded.

The final numbers of articles about immigration issues in each one of the four online newspapers are given in Table 1 . Once the articles were organized, it was easier to observe any visual pattern between the quantity of news published on a monthly basis and the events related to the Arizona SB1070 law’s enactment and planned implementation.

Table 1.

Number of articles about immigration found on each of the newspapers researched

Month El Diario NTR El Universal The New Yokr Times The Angeles Times
October 2009 0 0 6 3
November 2009 26 3 9 0
December 2009 51 18 10 0
January 2010 19 5 6 6
February 2010 22 1 8 3
March 2010 18 6 9 1
Abril 2010 47 21 25 3
May 2010 49 14 22 4
June 2010 32 8 21 3
July 2010 71 32 28 0
August 2010 43 24 11 0
September 2010 27 31 13 1
October 2010 10 11 5 0
Total 415 174 173 20

Source: Compiled by author based on field research.

Analysis and Findings

In October 2009, El Diario NTR and El Universal did not publish any news articles about immigration issues. The same was true of the Los Angeles Times for five months (November 2009, December 2009, July 2010, August 2010, and October 2010).

As expected, all of the newspapers show an increase in news articles related to immigration issues during the most critical months (from April to July 2010) of the Arizona SB1070 law (see Table 1). In April 2010, when the SB1070 was passed by the Arizona House of Representatives (April 13, 2010) and enacted (April 23, 2010), El Diario NTR had 47 news articles; El Universal, 21; The New York Times, 25; and the Los Angeles Times, 3. These numbers tells us how important the issue was for each community. In the case of Zacatecas the state economy can be affected by a law such as the SB1070 because many of its migrants will not be able to work and, as a consequence, the remittances the state receives potentially can decrease.

In the case of El Diario NTR, in December 2009, the newspaper published 51 articles. It is possible that this high quantity of news articles occurred because during the holidays Mexican immigrants, or paisanos, return to their communities and governmental programs are implemented to welcome those who live in the United States.

In July 2010, the month the SB1070 was set to be enforced (July 29, 2010), a federal district court judge stopped the enforcement of the law’s most controversial sections (July 28, 2010). It was also the month when three of the newspapers published the highest number of articles about immigration issues: El Diario NTR published 71 news articles; El Universal, 32; and The New York Times, 28.

The only newspaper that did not reflect the same pattern was the Los Angeles Times. The month that showed more news articles related to Mexican immigration issues was May 2010, when four articles were published.

El Diario NTR

From October 2009 to October 2010, the analysis of word frequency resulted in 12 words being the highest number of repeated words. Among this group were: indocumentados (undocumented), Mexicano (Mexican), migración (migration), migrante (migrant), and paisanos.

This first group of words reveals, as mentioned before, that the issue of immigration is of high importance to the state of Zacatecas. These findings correlate with Fairclough, Mulderring & Wodak (2011) notion of critical discourse analysis: the most important part to analyze is the relation between language and society. In this case, the language used to define those who leave Zacatecas to immigrate to the United States is not derogatory and denotes a familiarity (paisanos, Mexican), recognizing their status in the United States as undocumented without using the word ilegal (illegal). Paisano is a term adopted for more than 20 years by the Mexican government after launching the program called Paisano (Programa Paisano), created to eliminate the abuse and corruption against Mexicans when they return to Mexico from the United States ( Instituto Nacional de Migración [INM], 2012 ). The term is commonly used to refer to any Mexican national who is living in the United States. As an example of how the word paisanos was used here is a sentence published on December 12, 2009: “Para el inicio de estas vacaciones decembrinas, la Delegación de Tránsito en Fresnillo estableció operativos de atención a paisanos y feligreses, precisó el titular de la corporación, Antonio Arellano Chávez” (For the beginning of this holiday season, the Transit Delegation in Fresnillo established operations to attend paisanos and parishioners, said the head of the delegation Antonio Arellano Chávez) ( Torres, 2009 ) . In this sentence paisanos is used as a term to refer those migrants who are returning home for the holidays. As previously mentioned the term is not derogatory and is more a familiarity term, a way to consider those returning as part of the group, not strangers. Something similar happens with the word migrante (migrant). It’s used to denote a person status as someone who is from Zacatecas but lives and works in the United States. Here is an example published on August 15, 2010 on the newspaper where the word migrates was used: “Además de favorecer a sus comunidades a través de las remesas, los migrantes podrían contribuir más al desarrollo de sus países movilizando sus activos hacia carteras de inversión” (In addition to favoring their communities through remittances, migrants could contribute more to the development of their countries of origin by mobilizing their assets towards investment portfolios) ( Garduño, 2010 ). This sentence denotes the important economical role migrants have in their communities by sending their remittances which are used to benefit the community as a whole.

The words repeated 11 times through the timeline are: Arizona, braceros, California, connacionales (nationals), crisis, inmigración (immigration), and inmigrantes (immigrants). This group of words is more closely related to the issue of SB1070 in Arizona, to the state where most Mexicans live (California), and to the economic crisis that the world has experienced in recent years, which is mentioned in several news articles as one of the reasons migrants from Mexico are sending fewer remittances to their home communities. The rest of the words, connacionales (nationals), inmigrantes (immigrants), and bracero, are ways to refer to immigrants. Connacionales (nationals), as was the case within the first group of words, is a way to refer to immigrants with more familiarity, counting them as part of the nation. Braceros are immigrants who came to the United States between the 1940s and 1960s, primarily to work in agricultural jobs. These workers were fighting in 2010 for payments US companies still own them for their work decades ago. And finally, inmigración (immigration) is related to people’s actions of moving from one country to another.

Two words are used ten times in the timeline: ilegal (illegal) and victimas (victims). Both words are related to what Santa Ana (2002) presents as Teun Van Dijk’s main point of critical discourse analysis: the role discourse plays in reproducing social dominance. These two words are powerful words that, when included as part of news articles related to Mexican immigration, give us an idea of the difficulties many immigrants experience (victims), and how a word (illegal) can contribute to the framing of immigrants as criminals.

In conclusion, the preliminary findings indicate that El Diario NTR presents a more familiar perspective of immigrants. Some of the most commonly used words are ways of indicating that Mexican immigrants are part of their community, family, and their nation. Nevertheless, the two final words (“victims” and “illegal”) connect more directly with the realities many face once they are in the United States, where immigrants are singled out by their immigration status and categorized as criminals.

El Universal

A total of 23,205 words were originally found, and through the word frequency analysis it has been established that the Mexico City newspaper had the following most commonly used words: migrantes (migrants), connacionales (nationals), derechos (rights), frontera (border), gobierno (government), and indocumentados (undocumented). With the exception of migrantes (migrants), which was used 12 times, the rest of the words were used 11 times between October 2009 and October 2010. Again, these five words represent issues connected with society, as Fairclough (2009) define on their perspective of critical discourse analysis. Migrantes (migrants), connacionales (nationals), and indocumentados (undocumented) are different ways of referring to Mexican immigrants living in the United States in a familiar tone. For example, on an article published on April 22, 2010 a sentence where the world migrantes (migrants) was used states that “Es importante que en este país, ya sea en el contexto de una contienda política electoral o fuera de una contienda político electoral, se entienda que los migrantes mexicano no son una amenaza a la seguridad nacional de Estados Unidos” (It is important that in this country, whether in the context of an electoral political contest or outside a political electoral contest, it is understood that Mexican migrants are not a threat to the national security of the United States) ( Sarukhán, 2010 ). Here migrantes is used in a context where is important for people to understand that they are not a threat to the United States as they are commonly represented by politicians and media.

The other four words are related to the experiences lived by Mexican immigrants. The immigrants’ derechos (rights) are not respected in many situations they encounter and la frontera (the border) is a place where many Mexican immigrants lose their lives on their way into the United States. These are issues the government (gobierno) is called on by the media to take charge of and fix. The media may also try to persuade the United States federal and/or state governments to either do nothing to fix immigration or create laws, such as the SB1070, that make anybody who does not seem to be a part of the dominant society into a suspected foreigner.

Arizona, migratoria (migratory), and víctimas (victims), were used 10 times during the same timeframe, and this reflects how the discourse around the SB1070 law became an issue during the months researched. Arizona is the state where the SB1070 law was born, and migratoria (migratory) may be more closely related to possible immigration reform (called in Spanish reforma migratoria), for which there were rallies with thousands of people around the time that SB1070 was debated in Arizona. One example of how the word Arizona was used is news article published on April 25, 2010 is: “El activista indicó que aun cuando la ley está prevista para entrar en vigor dentro de tres meses, ya ha generado un clima de violencia y abusos contra la comunidad latina y no sólo a los indocumentados, por lo que Arizona se convirtió en un lugar peligroso para cualquier persona con rasgos latinos” (The activist said that even though the law is expected to be implemented within three months, it has already generated a climate of violence and abuse against the Latino community and not just the undocumented, making Arizona a dangerous place for anyone with Latinos characteristics) ( Ley Arizona, 2010 ). Here Arizona is used in a context that it in 2010 was a dangerous place to anyone who looked Latino giving the reader a sense of the experiences migrants live in such communities.

In conclusion, during the timeline in El Universal, the most frequently used words paint a similar picture as El Diario: they are familiar terms used to refer to Mexican immigrants and do not deny their experiences in immigrating to the United States and with laws such as SB1070.

The New York Times

Once the results from the newspapers in the United States were obtained, the difference in discourse was perceived. The following most frequently used words during the timeline were used 13 times: American, border, California, criminal, enforcement, health, homeland, illegal, immigrant, Mexican, and security. These words give a sense of distancing from the Other (Mexican immigrant), and this is also the case with American, border, and homeland. An example of the use of the words illegal and immigrant is the sentence published on news article on February 10, 2010 stating that “The number of illegal immigrants in the United States declined to 10.8 million in January 2009, a drop of one million since a peak in 2007, according to an estimate Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security” ( Preston, 2010 ). These words reinforce the idea of belonging to a country (the United States) and the vision of the border from the United States’ perspective. Reed-Danahay and Brettell (2008) describe belonging as a fluid process between the social practices of immigrants and the historical structures and cultural conditions they live in. For both authors, the discourses on race, “even when hidden in the ‘new’ racism that does not explicitly use a racial vocabulary, are an integral part of discourses of belonging” (p. 19). The stereotypical idea of the border is of a vulnerable place constantly violated by illegal immigrants (criminals) that can bring diseases (health) or compromise the security of the country. Once again, the relation between language and society ( Fairclough et al., 2011 ) is present, but so is van Dijk’s perspective about discourse that influences the reproduction of social dominance ( Santa Ana, 2002 ).

The second group of words is used 12 times each: violence, America, Arizona, arrested, deportation, Hispanic, drug, and illegally. The same type of discourse found in the previous group is found in the second. Connotations of criminality are present in such words as drug, illegally, arrested, and violence.

The way immigrants are referred to changes from Mexican to Hispanic, a term not accepted by many people who feel it is an imposition from the United States government because it was the term used in the census in the 1970s. America is a term used to refer to the United States, and Arizona was the epicenter of the SB1070 discourse. Deportation is related to the sense of not being welcome and not belonging, being unwanted, and not being welcome within the United States.

In conclusion, the words most used by The New York Times in articles related to Mexican immigration issues during the timeline of the research offer a different type of discourse than the ones found in El Diario NTR and El Universal. In the case of The New York Times, the words most frequently used reflect a perception of threat and perversity in immigrants, as explained by Van Dijk (2007) .

Los Angeles Times

The words used most during the research timeframe by the newspaper based in California were each used seven times: government, immigrant, and immigrants. This first group does not present very powerful or negative words.

The second group of words was used six times each, and this group begins to change the perspective: enforcement, immigration, and Mexican. Enforcement is the strongest word of the group and conveys the idea that something has to be applied.

The third group of words, with a frequency of five times, includes citizens, illegal, and legal. Again, the discourse moves toward an idea of being part of something or belonging (citizenship), criminality, and what is legal—such as the SB1070 law, which is related to the sense of legality and what is supposed to be right.

The last group of words occurred four times each: border, law, nation, undocumented, and violent. All of these words are related with the other groups of the most-used words in the Los Angeles Times. Border and nation are related to the sense of belonging; the border is what divides two countries—in this case Mexico and the United States—and what marks the differences between the nations; and undocumented pertains to the sense of legality given by having, or not having, immigration documentation to determine whether a person belongs to the nation. Lastly, violent is connected with the idea of criminal immigrants that is denoted by the illegal terminology and by the stereotype that immigrants bring crime to the United States.

In conclusion, the Los Angeles Times seemed not to present a negative discourse as The New York Times, but the words it used most approached the ones presented by the newspaper based in New York City. The United States newspapers use more negative and aggressive words compared with newspapers in Mexico.

Before and after SB1070, in both El Diario NTR and El Universal, references to immigrants varied from migrantes (migrants) to paisanos and indocumentados (undocumented).

The majority of news articles in El Diario NTR were about the insecurity in Mexico; the number of children returning from the United States who were entering the school system in Mexico; the possibility of an immigration reform; the marches Latinos participated in; the needs, benefits, and local contributions of remittances; the government programs aimed at benefitting immigrants in the U.S. who traveled to be with their families or return home; and the support that immigrants living in the United States gave to their communities. There were also stories about successful immigrants, as well as local reactions to Arizona’s SB1070 law.

In El Universal, the news articles concentrated on the insecurity in Mexico and its effects on immigrants, how much the remittances had decreased, and government programs more generally. In addition, there were stories of immigrants’ experiences and national reactions to SB1070.

In both The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, immigrants were often called Hispanics, immigrants, illegal, and Latino.

In The New York Times, articles concerned immigration reform rallies; how insecurity in Mexico affected immigrants; the possibility of an immigration reform; cost in health care as related to undocumented immigrants; and attacks against immigrants in the New York region.

In the Los Angeles Times, most of the articles were about how immigrants were not checked for health problems on borders; the working conditions of immigrants; how immigrants were crossing by sea from Mexico; how Zacatecan food was still better in Mexico; and how immigration issues hurt Obama.

In El Diario NTR, immigrants are presented as part of the community. Meanwhile, in El Universal, immigrant issues are not presented in a familiar manner as they were in the newspaper based in Zacatecas. This difference is understandable, since El Universal is a national newspaper based in Mexico City, unconnected with the experiences of migrant communities, such as those from Zacatecas.

Related to negative discourse in the U.S. newspapers, the word that continually occurred was illegal, with immigrant and alien constituting a close second and third.

In the case of the newspapers from Mexico, the use of the words illegal, illegals, and illegally was present, but only a few times. During the analysis, those words were never within the list of most-used words, compared with the U.S. newspapers, in which illegal was among the words used the most over several months and, during the SB1070 debate, used 672 times.

Conclusion

It has been said many times before that if people hear a lie a thousand times, they will ultimately believe it’s the truth. This occurs with the language the media uses in news stories related to immigrants or immigration issues. If audiences constantly hear that immigrants are illegal, that they are criminals, that they are unhealthy, or that they are lazy, these words can potentially have the effect of reinforcing stereotypes passed down through generations. After all, as Stangor and Schaller (1996) stated, the media is the prime transmitter of stereotypes. As a part of the media, the Internet has become the main distributor of news content in the last three decades. This is the reason I was interested in researching how many times certain words have been used in newspapers, both in Mexico and the United States, focusing on articles about immigration issues. As mentioned in this paper, there are many studies on how the media represents immigrants. More than any other researcher, van Dijk (2007) approached the issue clearly when he argued that immigrants are presented in the media as falling under three categories: “three categories: they are different, they are perverse, and they are a threat” (p. 11). This research showed that the words used most often in articles on immigration in The New York Times were criminal, enforcement, health, illegal, security, violence, arrested, deportation, drug, and illegally. In articles on the same subject in The Los Angeles Times, the most used words were enforcement, illegal, and violent. All these words can potentially have negative connotations when they are constantly used in articles about immigration issues. The constant use of words depicting migrants as invaders, criminals, or the other could be seen in most of the newspapers analyzed, including those from Mexico. This finding tells us how common such terms have become in the media and how probably people probably don’t realize the extent to which their use can damage the image of immigrants in general. In some of the news articles analyzed, the context reinforced the stereotype of immigrants as being dependent on government resources. This sentiment is clearly depicted in the media in relation to Latino immigrants, especially during controversial events (such as the proposition, signing, and implementation of SB1070 in Arizona). From April to July 2010 (the most critical months for SB1070), all four newspapers researched published an increasing number of articles related to Mexican-immigration issues.

Additionally, one of the findings of this research was that Mexican newspapers also used the term illegal sporadically. This finding suggests the extent to which this term, which is recognized by many in the United States as being derogatory, has been adopted commonly in a country, which, until recently, provided the highest number of immigrants to the United States.

It is important for the media to be aware of how minorities perceive the words that are used to represent their cultures to others to the world. Now, with the growth of social media as a distributor of information and news, it’s critical to understand the power of the words the media uses. Sadly, the representation of the other in the United States hasn’t changed much in centuries, and this is why it is so important to continue conducting research that shows the role the media has in shaping people’s perceptions of those who look or sound different to them.

In recent years, campaigns have challenged the language used to represent immigrants in the media, and these campaigns have demanded that media companies change their choice of words. In April and May 2013, both The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times decided not to use the word illegal when referring to immigrants in the stories they published. Nevertheless, many media outlets have not changed their policies concerning the language they use when referring to immigrants.

During the 2016 presidential campaign in the United States, politicians such as Donald Trump defined Mexican immigrants as criminals and rapists during his campaign launch speech in New York City. This suggests that there is an urgent need for more research about the implications of media language use and its relationship to the reinforcing of stereotypes about Latino immigrants in general and Mexicans in particular.

This type of research is important because the language used by the media in articles about immigration shapes the messages society receives and greatly influences people’s perceptions of those who decide to move from one country to another. As is often said, words matter, language is power, and this power is constantly used and abused by the media.

Referencias

1

"Ley Arizona" es racista y retrograda. (25 de abril de 2010). El Universal. Recuperado de www.eluniversal.com.mx/estados/75648.html

2010"Ley Arizona" es racista y retrograda El Universal El Universal www.eluniversal.com.mx/estados/75648.html

2

Cheng, L. et al. (2009). Hate vs. love, two-way approach to issue framing: An empirical study on immigration news coverage in the regional newspapers in Castilla & Leon. Zer, (26), 35-57.

2009Hate vs. love, two-way approach to issue framing: An empirical study on immigration news coverage in the regional newspapers in Castilla & Leon L. Cheng Zer263557

3

Davis, H. (1985). Discourse and media influence. En T. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse and communication: New approaches to the analysis of mass media discourse and communication (pp. 44-59). Berlín, Alemania: Walter de Gruyter.

1985Discourse and media influence H. Davis T. van Dijk Discourse and communication: New approaches to the analysis of mass media discourse and communication4459Berlín, AlemaniaWalter de Gruyter

4

DeGenova, N. (2013). The legal production of Mexican/migrant “illegality”. En J. A. Dowling y J. X. Inda (Eds.), Governing immigration through crime: A reader (pp. 41-57). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

2013The legal production of Mexican/migrant “illegality” N. DeGenova J. A. Dowling J. X. Inda Governing immigration through crime: A reader4157Stanford, CAStanford University Press

5

Delgado, R. y Márquez, H. (2007). El sistema migratorio México-Estados Unidos: Dilemas de la integración regional, el desarrollo y la migración. En S. Castles y R. Delgado (Eds.), Migración y desarrollo: Perspectivas desde el sur (pp. 125-153). Zacatecas, México: Miguel Ángel Porrúa.

2007El sistema migratorio México-Estados Unidos: Dilemas de la integración regional, el desarrollo y la migración R. Delgado H. Márquez S. Castles R. Delgado Migración y desarrollo: Perspectivas desde el sur125153Zacatecas, MéxicoMiguel Ángel Porrúa

6

Díaz, L. (2011). Latina/o hope. New York, N.Y.: Springer.

2011 L. Díaz Latina/o hopeNew York, N.YSpringer

7

Fairclough, N. (1995). Media discourse. Nueva York, NY: Edward Arnold.

1995 N. Fairclough Media discourseNueva York, NYEdward Arnold

8

Fairclough, N. (2009). A dialectical-relational approach to critical discourse analysis in social research. En R. Wodak y M. Meyer (Eds.), Methods of critical discourse Analysis (pp. 162-186). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.

2009A dialectical-relational approach to critical discourse analysis in social research N. Fairclough R. Wodak M. Meyer Methods of critical discourse Analysis162186Thousand Oaks, CASage Publishing

9

Fairclough, N., Mulderrig, J. y Wodak, R. (2011). Critical discourse analysis. En T. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse Studies: A multidisciplinary introduction (pp. 357-378). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.

2011Critical discourse analysis N. Fairclough J. Mulderrig R. Wodak T. van Dijk Discourse Studies: A multidisciplinary introduction357378Thousand Oaks, CASage Publishing

10

Galan, E. (2006). La representación de los inmigrantes en la ficción televisiva en España, propuesta para un análisis de contenido: El comisario y hospital central. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, (61), 1-10.

2006La representación de los inmigrantes en la ficción televisiva en España, propuesta para un análisis de contenido: El comisario y hospital central E. Galan Revista Latina de Comunicación Social61110

11

Garduño, S. (15 de agosto de 2010). Llaman a reinventir ahorra de migrantes. El Diario NTR. Recuperado de http://eldiariontr.com/2010/08/15

2010Llaman a reinventir ahorra de migrantes S. Garduño El Diario NTR http://eldiariontr.com/2010/08/15

12

Hanson, R. (2008). Mass communication: Living in a media world. Washington, D. C.: CQ Press.

2008 R. Hanson Mass communication: Living in a media worldWashington, D. C.CQ Press

13

Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía. (2017). Información de migración internacional con datos de la ENOE. México: Inegi.

2017 Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía Información de migración internacional con datos de la ENOEMéxicoInegi

14

Instituto Nacional de Migración. (2012). Programa paisano. Recuperado de http://www.paisano.gob.mx/index.php/programa-paisano

2012 Instituto Nacional de Migración Programa paisano http://www.paisano.gob.mx/index.php/programa-paisano

15

Metzger, M. (2009). The study of media effects in the era of internet communications. En R. Naby y M. Oliver (Eds.). The Sage Handbook of media processes and effects (pp. 561-575). Los Ángeles, CA: Sage.

2009The study of media effects in the era of internet communications M. Metzger R. Naby M. Oliver he Sage Handbook of media processes and effects561575Los Ángeles, CASage

16

Ollaquindia, R. (19 de enero de 2015). Zacatecas, primer lugar en migración poblacional: Inegi. La Jornada Zacatecas. Recuperado de http://ljz.mx/2015/01/29/zacatecas-primer-lugar-en-migracion-poblacional-inegi/

2015Zacatecas, primer lugar en migración poblacional: Inegi R. Ollaquindia La Jornada Zacatecas http://ljz.mx/2015/01/29/zacatecas-primer-lugar-en-migracion-poblacional-inegi/

17

Preston, J. (10 de febrero de 2010). Illegal Immigrant Population Drops. The New York Times. Recuperado de https://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/us/10brfs-ILLEGALIMMIG_BRF.html

2010Illegal Immigrant Population Drops J. Preston The New York Times https://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/us/10brfs-ILLEGALIMMIG_BRF.html

18

Reed-Danahay, D. y Brettell, C. (2008). Inclusion and exclusion. En Autores (Eds.), Citizenship, political engagement, and belonging: Immigrants in Europe and the United States (p. 19). Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

2008Inclusion and exclusion D. Reed-Danahay C. Brettell D. Reed-Danahay C. Brettell Citizenship, political engagement, and belonging: Immigrants in Europe and the United States19Piscataway, NJRutgers University Press

19

Richardson, J. (2007). Analyzing newspapers: An approach from critical discourse analysis. Nueva York, NY: Palgrave.

2007 J. Richardson Analyzing newspapers: An approach from critical discourse analysisNueva York, NYPalgrave

20

Riffe, D., Lacy, S. y Fico, F. G. (2005). Analyzing media messages: using quantitative content analysis in research. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

2005 D. Riffe S. Lacy F. G. Fico Analyzing media messages: using quantitative content analysis in researchMahwah, NJLawrence Erlbaum Associates

21

Rodríguez, R. y Mena, N. (2008). Opinión pública y frames: La crisis de los cayucos. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, (63), 341-347.

2008Opinión pública y frames: La crisis de los cayucos R. Rodríguez N. Mena Revista Latina de Comunicación Social63341347

22

Santa Ana, O. (2002). Brown tide rising: metaphors of Latinos in contemporary American public discourse. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

2002 O. Santa Ana Brown tide rising: metaphors of Latinos in contemporary American public discourseAustin, TXUniversity of Texas Press

23

Sarukhán critica ley antiinmigrante. (22 de abril de 2010). El Universal. Recuperado de www.eluniversal.com.mx/internacional/vi_67289.html

2010Sarukhán critica ley antiinmigrante. El Universal El Universal www.eluniversal.com.mx/internacional/vi_67289.html

24

Stangor , C. y Schaller, M. (1996). Stereotypes as individual and collective representation. En C. Macrae, C. Stangor y M. Hewstone (Eds.), Stereotypes and Stereotyping (pp. 3-37). Nueva York, NY: The Guilford Press.

1996Stereotypes as individual and collective representation C. Stangor M. Schaller C. Macrae C. Stangor M. Hewstone Stereotypes and Stereotyping337Nueva York, NYThe Guilford Press

25

Torres, E. (12 de diciembre de 2009). Auxilian a Paisanos. El Diario NTR. Recuperado de http://eldiariontr.com/2009/12/12

2009Auxilian a Paisanos E. Torres El Diario NTR http://eldiariontr.com/2009/12/12

26

Tuiran, R. (2002). Migración México-Estados Unidos presente y futuro. Ciudad de México, México: Conapo.

2002 R. Tuiran Migración México-Estados Unidos presente y futuroCiudad de México, MéxicoConapo

27

US Census Bureau (2010). Race and Hispanic origin of the foreign-born population in the United States: 2007. Recuperado de https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/2010/acs/acs-11.pdf

2010 US Census Bureau Race and Hispanic origin of the foreign-born population in the United States: 2007 https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/2010/acs/acs-11.pdf

28

Van Dijk, T. (1991). Racism and the Press. Nueva York, NY: Routledge.

1991 T. Van Dijk Racism and the PressNueva York, NYRoutledge

29

Van Dijk, T. (1993). Principles of critical discourse analysis. Discourse and Society, (2), 249-253.

1993Principles of critical discourse analysis T. Van Dijk Discourse and Society2249253

30

Van Dijk, T. (2003). Critical discourse analysis. En D. Schiffrin, D. Tannen y H. Hamilton. (Eds.). The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (pp. 466-485). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

2003Critical discourse analysis T. Van Dijk D. Schiffrin D. Tannen H. Hamilton The Handbook of Discourse Analysis466485Malden, MABlackwell

31

Van Dijk, T. (2007). Discurso racista. En J. Igartua y C. Muñiz. (Eds.). Medios de comunicación, inmigración y sociedad (9-18). Salamanca, España: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca.

2007Discurso racista T. Van Dijk J. Igartua C. Muñiz Medios de comunicación, inmigración y sociedad918Salamanca, EspañaEdiciones Universidad de Salamanca



Desarrollado por eScire - Consultoría, Tecnologías y Gestión del Conocimiento SA de CV





La inmigración se ha convertido en un tema relevante en el mundo actual. Millones de personas se mudan de sus lugares de origen a otros del mundo para buscar una mejor vida. Esta migración mundial constante ha formado parte de la humanidad desde sus comienzos. En últimas épocas, las personas tienen muchas razones para emigrar y éstas pueden ser desde cuestiones económicas, reunirse con miembros de su familia, buscar mejores oportunidades de trabajo, hasta huir de la violencia.

Algo más sucede con la llegada de la gente a otro país: la imagen y percepción que difunden de los inmigrantes los medios de comunicación. Al analizar la historia de Estados Unidos, resultan claros muchos ejemplos de cómo contribuyó la forma de representar a los extranjeros por parte de los medios de comunicación, en última instancia, a retroalimentar los estereotipos de los recién llegados. Los irlandeses, judíos, japoneses y mexicanos son sólo algunos de los grupos de inmigrantes que han tenido que luchar contra su representación negativa en los medios de comunicación en la historia de Estados Unidos.

Más que cualquier otro inmigrante, el mexicano enfrenta experiencias muy particulares debido a la proximidad geográfica entre ambos países o a la historia y el territorio comunes que una vez compartieron, esto da lugar a que la relación entre México y Estados Unidos continúe siendo bastante dinámica (Delgado y Márquez, 2007). Con todo, la relación entre los dos países nunca ha sido completamente beneficiosa para los inmigrantes, quienes, durante más de un siglo, han cruzado la frontera norte encontrándose con todo tipo de experiencias desagradables alimentadas, en parte, por la forma como son percibidos. Una de las principales formas en que se representa al inmigrante mexicano tiene su origen en su percepción como ilegal. La idea de que todos los mexicanos son ilegales y, por tanto, delincuentes, es un discurso que los políticos seguían sosteniendo tan recientemente como la campaña presidencial de 2016. Para DeGenova (2013) , todos los cambios importantes que ha efectuado Estados Unidos en la ley de inmigración desde 1965 sólo han contribuido a reprimir la migración legal de los mexicanos y promover la idea de que son invasores que violan las leyes del país, las imágenes y la forma en que se les representa no han cambiado y ésta contribuye a la concepción del estereotipo que se les atribuye. El propósito de este trabajo es analizar la forma en que los medios de comunicación, tanto en México como en Estados Unidos, representan a los inmigrantes mexicanos y cómo su elección de las palabras contribuye a reforzar los estereotipos sobre ellos. Se ha llevado a cabo un análisis de los datos resultantes con el fin de obtener una mejor perspectiva sobre la forma en que los medios representan a los inmigrantes a través del tipo de palabras y su uso constante en artículos periodísticos, tanto en inglés como en español, así como el contexto en el que las utilizaron y presentaron al lector.

El poder del lenguaje

El lenguaje es un arma poderosa y, dependiendo de cómo se use, su significado puede tener un efecto positivo o negativo. Para Fairclough (1995) , el uso del lenguaje tiene que ver con las identidades sociales de las personas, sus relaciones sociales y su sistema de conocimiento y creencias. Este último aspecto del uso del lenguaje se ve influenciado por los medios de comunicación, puede corresponder con la información que dan a conocer y la forma en que esta información interactúa con las creencias de las personas.

Cuando se transmite el mensaje en los medios, es importante no sólo analizar el texto, sino también la forma en que éste puede influir en el lector para que crea en algo que trasciende el significado de las palabras. Van Dijk (2007) afirma que los grandes oradores, en muchos casos, aprovechan este poder sin tener en cuenta las consecuencias y pueden controlar casi todos los tipos de contextos, entre ellos la comunicación escrita y verbal. Desde este punto de vista, los medios de comunicación son, sin duda, uno de los canales más importantes para controlar el pensamiento de las personas, Hanson (2008) explica que tienen un impacto actitudinal en las personas y pueden crear ideas o sentimientos sobre productos o individuos a partir de su contenido mediático. Los medios de comunicación desempeñan un papel importante en el desarrollo de ideas, tendencias y creencias, capaz de influir en la formación de ideas estereotipadas sobre grupos étnicos no dominantes. Según Rodríguez y Mena (2008) , los medios de comunicación gozan de una posición privilegiada debido a la forma en que los periodistas encuadran la información, la cual puede propiciar una perspectiva con distorsiones y estereotipos. Para Davis (1985) , la retórica de las noticias está preestructurada por el proceso de selección de noticias y el temario de los responsables de lo que se ha de publicar o no. Incluso con la proliferación de Internet como distribuidor masivo de contenido de medios en los últimos años, como asevera Metzger (2009) , no todo ha cambiado en cuanto a su efecto en el público. Lo que explica el autor es que gran parte del contenido que se distribuye a través de Internet continúa basándose principalmente en las fuentes tradicionales de información de los periódicos convencionales, pero con formato en línea. Riffe, Lacy y Fico (2005) aseguran que las investigaciones de los últimos años sugieren que el efecto de los medios masivos de comunicación depende de diversos factores y condiciones, entre ellos, el grado de instrucción de la gente y su nivel sociocultural y socioeconómico, según Hanson (2008) , es muy difícil distinguir la información informativa de la persuasiva. Aunque la investigación sobre el efecto de los medios en el público ha evolucionado junto con los medios, para muchos todavía resulta difícil cuantificar de forma clara la influencia que tienen los medios en la opinión pública.

Van Dijk (2007) aclara que, en general, los inmigrantes y las minorías son vistos como los otros y su representación casi siempre se limita «a tres categorías: son diferentes, son corruptos y son una amenaza» (p. 11). Para Galán (2006) , los medios de comunicación suelen presentar a los inmigrantes en un contexto de anormalidad o ilegalidad y otras situaciones poco favorables para su imagen, todos estos factores con capaces de influir en la percepción de la realidad de las personas. La forma en que los medios de comunicación difunden la información sobre los temas relacionados con la inmigración puede influir en la opinión pública, así como en la percepción de los propios migrantes y los problemas relacionados con sus movimientos ( Cheng et al., 2009 ). Para Fairclough (1995) , el discurso de los medios de comunicación influye en la forma en que las personas usan el lenguaje mediante el uso de patrones similares a situaciones de la vida real, pero remodelándolos. El discurso –específicamente el análisis del discurso crítico– tiene mucho que ver con el lenguaje y van Dijk (2003) lo define como «un tipo de investigación analítica del discurso que estudia principalmente la forma en que el poder social, el predominio y la desigualdad se expresan, reproducen y se “resisten” a los textos y las conversaciones en el contexto social y político» (p. 352). Richardson (2007) asevera que el análisis crítico del discurso pretende investigar la relación entre «el texto y sus condiciones sociales, ideologías y relaciones de poder» (p. 27).

Metodología

El marco teórico de este trabajo se ha basado en la versión dialéctica-relacional de Fairclough (2009) del análisis crítico del discurso y describe los cuatro pasos necesarios para llevarlo a cabo: 1) enfocarse en un error social en su aspecto semiótico; para efectos de esta investigación, el error social es la Ley SB1070, 2) identificar cuáles son los obstáculos para abordar el error social. En esta investigación, se identificaron el lenguaje y las palabras que se utilizaban antes y después de aprobar y promulgar la SB1070 en 2010, 3) analizar si el orden social necesita del error social. Para efectos de esta investigación, se analizó la cantidad de veces que se usaron determinadas palabras en los periódicos y 4) identificar formas de superar los obstáculos. Esta perspectiva del análisis crítico del discurso está más estrechamente vinculada con la relación entre el lenguaje y la sociedad, también se tomó en cuenta el concepto propuesto por van Dijk (1993, p. 253) , «la relación entre texto, conversación, cognición social, poder, sociedad y cultura» como parte del marco teórico y en base al mismo se analizó la forma en que se presenta el texto en los medios de comunicación en México y Estados Unidos. Más concretamente, se analizó el uso común del lenguaje con respecto a los inmigrantes en cuatro periódicos, la influencia del discurso negativo que empleado en los mismos, la forma en que los periódicos de México y Estados Unidos perciben a los inmigrantes, según el tipo de artículos analizados, la forma en que dicho lenguaje refleja la cultura de inmigración de ambos países y cómo perciben a los inmigrantes mexicanos ambos países.

Versiones en línea de periódicos

La investigación se centra en noticias sobre temas de inmigración publicados en versiones en línea de periódicos impresos en México y Estados Unidos, así como en las palabras más utilizadas. Para fines del trabajo, en las noticias se incluyeron publicaciones en línea que informan al público sobre un suceso, pero no lo analizan (por ejemplo, editoriales, columnas o reseñas). De esta manera, una vez realizado el análisis de palabras, se eliminó la información cruda de números, preposiciones, conjunciones y pronombres para centrar la atención únicamente en las palabras empleadas para representar a los inmigrantes.

La investigación analiza la versión en línea de El Diario NTR, uno de los periódicos más importantes de Zacatecas, México, estado desde donde emigraron la mayoría de los inmigrantes a Estados Unidos en 2010, como afirma Tuiran (2002) : «una de cada tres personas nacidas en Zacatecas radica en el país vecino del norte» (p. 80). Entre 2008 y 2013, Zacatecas fue el estado que perdió más habitantes debido a la migración a Estados Unidos, según las cifras proporcionadas por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía (Inegi) ( Ollaquindia, 2015 ). Para 2015, Zacatecas fue desplazado al segundo lugar por Michoacán. Según el boletín de prensa de Inegi núm. 41, 115.8 de cada 10 000 habitantes de Zacatecas emigraron a Estados Unidos, mientras que la cifra de Michoacán fue de 136.1 por cada 10 000 ( Inegi, 2017 ).

Con el objeto de obtener la perspectiva regional de Estados Unidos, también se consultó Los Angeles Times, uno de los periódicos más importantes de Los Ángeles, California, la ciudad con el mayor número de inmigrantes mexicanos provenientes de Zacatecas. Los Ángeles es el hogar de 3 510 677 mexicanos (Oficina del Censo de los Estados Unidos, 2010) y la segunda población mexicana más grande del mundo, después de la de la Ciudad de México.

El principal aspecto que fue considerado para seleccionar los periódicos fue su nivel de presencia en sus respectivos mercados y de acuerdo con las vistas de página, su circulación y rangos. No se consideró la inclinación política de los periódicos, ya que ese aspecto no formaba parte de la investigación. De cualquier modo, cabe destacar que algunos consideran a Los Angeles Times y The New York Times medios liberales, mientras que otros los consideran más como centristas liberales. Aunque, para muchos, el primero también se inclina más hacia el lado conservador. Van Dijk (1991) señala: «lo que para un lector o periodista es un periódico conservador, puede ser más o menos liberal para otro lector, o en otro país, o viceversa» (p. 9). Por otro lado, también se eligió El Diario NTR para analizar el punto de vista de los medios en Zacatecas –el estado desde el cual emigró la mayoría de los mexicanos en 2010–, junto con Los Angeles Times, el de la ciudad que se convirtió en su hogar.

Se tomaron en cuenta versiones en línea de periódicos de la Ciudad de México y Nueva York con el fin de conocer el punto de vista de los medios de comunicación nacionales sobre temas de inmigración. Se seleccionó El Universal como el periódico nacional de México y para Estados Unidos fue The New York Times, el tercer periódico de mayor circulación en el país, después de USA Today y The Wall Street Journal, fundado el 18 de septiembre de 1851 y con una circulación diaria de 916 911 copias para 2012 (New York Times, 2011). Para realizar la búsqueda de artículos en las ediciones en línea de Los Angeles Times, El Universal y The New York Times, se utilizó una palabra que formaba parte del núcleo de esta investigación. La palabra era inmigrantes en los dos periódicos en inglés, e inmigrantes en los dos periódicos en español. La línea de tiempo que se seleccionó para la búsqueda fue del 13 de octubre de 2009 al 12 de octubre de 2010. Se eligió esta línea de tiempo teniendo en cuenta la ley SB1070 de Arizona, sumamente controversial. Según Díaz (2011) , dicha ley estipula que las personas indocumentadas que viven en Arizona cometen un delito estatal. Con objeto de obtener una perspectiva más completa sobre el discurso negativo de los medios de comunicación sobre los inmigrantes, en particular los mexicanos, la línea de tiempo (figura 1) contempla los seis meses previos a la aprobación de la ley en la Cámara de Representantes de Arizona (13 de abril de 2010) y hasta tres meses y 14 días después de la fecha en que se suponía que la ley debía entrar en vigor (29 de julio de 2010).

​Figura 1.

Cronología en la que se basó la investigación

1665-8906-migra-v10-e2024-f4.png

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de investigaciones de campo.

Según Fairclough (2009) , la primera etapa de un análisis crítico de discurso debe centrarse en el error social, los cuales son «aspectos de los sistemas sociales, formas u órdenes que son perjudiciales para el bienestar humano» (p. 167). Una ley como la SB1070 puede considerarse un sistema social que perjudica el bienestar de los inmigrantes, específicamente quienes provienen de México.

Datos

La búsqueda inicial en línea arrojó 1 718 artículos de The New York Times, 195 de The Los Angeles Times, 186 de El Universal y 415 de El Diario NTR. Se eliminaron los datos que incluían la opinión del autor en todo tipo de artículos (por ejemplo, libros, películas y alimentos). Después de este proceso, el número final de artículos de cada uno de los periódicos en línea quedó de la siguiente manera: 173 de The New York Times, 20 de Los Angeles Times, 174 de El Universal y 415 de El Diario NTR. El número de artículos de El Diario NTR no cambió porque la búsqueda de artículos en el periódico en línea se llevó a cabo artículo por artículo. El proceso de limpieza de datos tomó mucho tiempo debido al gran volumen y la investigación no tomó en cuenta los artículos que no se relacionaban con la inmigración mexicana.

Se presentan los números finales de artículos sobre temas de inmigración encontrados en cada uno de los cuatro periódicos en línea en el cuadro 1. Una vez que se organizaron los artículos, fue más fácil detectar patrones visuales entre la cantidad de noticias publicadas mensualmente y los acontecimientos relacionados con la Ley SB1070 de Arizona y su puesta en vigor.

Cuadro 1.

Número de artículos sobre inmigración que se encontraron en cada uno de los periódicos investigados

Mes y años El Diario NTR El Universal The New Yokr Times The Angeles Times
Octubre 2009 0 0 6 3
Noviembre 2009 26 3 9 0
Diciembre 2009 51 18 10 0
Enero 2010 19 5 6 6
Febrero 2010 22 1 8 3
Marzo 2010 18 6 9 1
Abril 2010 47 21 25 3
Mayo 2010 49 14 22 4
Junio 2010 32 8 21 3
Julio 2010 71 32 28 0
Agosto 2010 43 24 11 0
Septiembre 2010 27 31 13 1
Octubre 2010 10 11 5 0
Total 415 174 173 20

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de investigaciones de campo.

Análisis y conclusiones

En octubre de 2009, El Diario NTR y El Universal no publicaron ninguna noticia sobre temas de inmigración. Lo mismo ocurrió con Los Angeles Times en cinco meses específicos (noviembre de 2009, diciembre de 2009, julio de 2010, agosto de 2010 y octubre de 2010), sin embargo, como era de esperarse, en todos los periódicos se observó un mayor número de noticias relacionadas con temas de inmigración durante los meses más críticos (de abril a julio de 2010) de la Ley SB1070 de Arizona (cuadro 1). Cuando la ley SB1070 fue aprobada por la Cámara de Representantes de Arizona el 13 de abril de 2010 y luego promulgada el 23 de abril de 2010, El Diario NTR incluyó 47 noticias sobre el tema, El Universal, 21, The New York Times, 25 y Los Angeles Times, 3. Estas cifras ilustran la importancia de este tema en cada una de las comunidades.

Por otro lado, El Diario NTR publicó 51 artículos en diciembre de 2009. Es posible el aumento de noticias sobre el tema se produjera porque en esas fechas los inmigrantes mexicanos –o paisanos– regresan a sus comunidades para las vacaciones y el gobierno implementa ciertos programas para dar la bienvenida a los mexicanos que viven en Estados Unidos. En el caso de Zacatecas, la economía del estado puede verse afectada por una ley como la SB1070 porque muchos de sus migrantes no podrán trabajar y, en consecuencia, las remesas que este estado recibe podrían disminuir.

En julio de 2010, mes que se programó para la entrada en vigor de la SB1070 (29 de julio de 2010), un juez de un tribunal de distrito federal suspendió la aplicación de las secciones más controvertidas de la ley (28 de julio de 2010) y tres de los periódicos publicaron el mayor número de noticias sobre temas de inmigración: El Diario NTR, 71 noticias, El Universal, 32 y The New York Times, 28. El único periódico que no siguió este patrón fue Los Angeles Times, pues el mes cuando publicaron más noticias relacionadas con temas de inmigración mexicana fue mayo de 2010, con cuatro artículos.

El Diario NTR

De octubre de 2009 a octubre de 2010, el análisis de la frecuencia de palabras determinó que el número más alto de palabras repetidas fue 12, entre las cuales se encontraban las siguientes: indocumentados, mexicanos, migración, migrantes y paisanos. Este primer conjunto revela, como se mencionó con anterioridad, que el tema de la inmigración es muy importante en Zacatecas y los resultados confirman la idea sobre el análisis crítico del discurso de Fairclough, Mulderring y Wodak (2011) : la parte más importante a analizar es la relación entre el lenguaje y la sociedad. En este caso, el lenguaje utilizado para definir a quienes dejan Zacatecas para emigrar a Estados Unidos no es despectivo y denota familiaridad (paisanos, mexicano), reconociendo su situación en Estados Unidos como indocumentados sin usar la palabra ilegal. Paisano es un término adoptado desde hace más de 20 años por el gobierno mexicano cuando lanzó el programa con ese nombre, concebido para eliminar el abuso y la corrupción contra los mexicanos en su regreso a México desde Estados Unidos ( Instituto Nacional de Migración [INM], 2012 ) y se usa comúnmente para referirse a cualquier ciudadano mexicano que vive en Estados Unidos. A continuación, se ilustra la forma en que se usó la palabra paisanos en una oración publicada el 12 de diciembre de 2009: «Para el inicio de estas vacaciones decembrinas, la Delegación de Tránsito en Fresnillo, estableció operativos de atención a paisanos y feligreses, precisó el titular de la corporación, Antonio Arellano Chávez» ( Torres, 2009 ). En esta oración, la palabra paisanos se utiliza como un término para identificar a aquellos migrantes que regresan a sus hogares para las vacaciones. Como ya se dijo antes, el término no es despectivo, sino uno que denota familiaridad, una forma de considerar a los que regresan como parte de un grupo y no como extraños. Ocurre algo parecido con la palabra migrante, se utiliza para denotar la situación de una persona originaria Zacatecas pero que vive y trabaja en Estados Unidos. Aquí un ejemplo publicado el 15 de agosto de 2010 en el periódico: «Además de favorecer a sus comunidades a través de las remesas, es posible que los migrantes contribuyan más al desarrollo de sus países de origen ya que movilizan sus activos hacia carteras de inversión» ( Garduño, 2010 ). Esta oración destaca el importante papel económico que tienen los migrantes en sus comunidades gracias al envío de remesas que benefician a las comunidades en general.

Las palabras siguientes se repitieron 11 veces a través de la línea de tiempo: Arizona, braceros, California, connacionales, crisis, inmigración, e inmigrantes. Este conjunto de palabras es el que más se identifica con el tema de la ley SB1070, estado donde radica la mayoría de los mexicanos (California) y con la reciente crisis económica mundial, difundida en varios artículos de la prensa como una de las razones de la disminución en el envío de remesas de mexicanos a sus comunidades de origen. El resto de las palabras, connacionales, inmigrantes y bracero, son formas de referirse a los inmigrantes. La primera fue empleada en el primer conjunto de palabras y es una forma de referirse a los inmigrantes de forma familiar, e implica que se les considera como parte de los nuestros, la segunda (inmigrantes) tiene que ver con la acción de trasladarse de un país a otro y los braceros son inmigrantes que llegaron a Estados Unidos entre las décadas de 1940 y 1960, principalmente para trabajar en los campos agrícolas. En 2010, exigieron el pago por el trabajo realizado, mismo que todavía les deben varias empresas estadounidenses.

Dos palabras se usan diez veces en la línea de tiempo: ilegal y víctimas. Ambas están relacionadas con lo que Santa Ana (2002) define como el punto principal del análisis crítico del discurso de Teun van Dijk: el papel que juega el discurso en la reproducción de la dominancia social. Son tan poderosas que, cuando se incluyen en las noticias relacionadas con la inmigración mexicana, comunican la idea de las dificultades que experimentan muchos inmigrantes –víctimas– y de cómo una palabra –ilegal– puede contribuir a encasillar a los inmigrantes y presentarlos como delincuentes.

En conclusión, los resultados preliminares indican que El Diario NTR presenta una perspectiva que transmite un grado de familiaridad de los inmigrantes. Algunas de las palabras que más se utilizan son formas para indicar que se considera a los inmigrantes mexicanos parte de su comunidad, gente y país. Sin embargo, las dos últimas palabras (víctimas e ilegales) se conectan más directamente con las realidades que enfrentan una vez que han ingresado a Estados Unidos, donde se identifica a los inmigrantes por su situación migratoria y se les categoriza como delincuentes.

El Universal

Originalmente, se encontró un total de 23 205 palabras y se estableció que el periódico de la Ciudad de México contenía las palabras de mayor uso mediante el análisis de frecuencia de palabras: migrantes, connacionales, derechos, frontera, gobierno e indocumentados. Con la excepción de migrantes, que se usó 12 veces, el resto de las palabras se utilizó en 11 ocasiones entre octubre de 2009 y octubre de 2010. Una vez más, estas cinco palabras guardan relación con temas relacionados con la sociedad, como lo establece Fairclough (2009) en su perspectiva del análisis crítico del discurso. Migrantes, connacionales e indocumentados son las diferentes formas de referirse a los inmigrantes mexicanos que viven en Estados Unidos en un tono familiar. Por ejemplo, en un artículo publicado el 22 de abril de 2010, una frase en la que se usó la palabra migrantes destaca que «Es importante que en este país, ya sea en el contexto de una contienda política electoral o fuera de una contienda política electoral, se entienda que los migrantes mexicanos no son una amenaza a la seguridad nacional de los Estados Unidos» ( Sarukhán, 2010 ). En este caso, migrantes se utiliza en un contexto donde se busca que la gente entienda que no representan una amenaza para Estados Unidos, como suelen presentarlos los políticos y los medios de comunicación.

Las otras cuatro palabras están relacionadas con las experiencias vividas por los inmigrantes mexicanos. Los derechos de los inmigrantes no se respetan en muchas situaciones que enfrentan y la frontera es un lugar donde muchos inmigrantes mexicanos pierden la vida en su paso hacia Estados Unidos. Estos son temas en los que los medios de comunicación solicitan al gobierno que intervenga y establezca soluciones. Los medios de comunicación también pueden intentar persuadir a los gobiernos federales y/o estatales de Estados Unidos de no hacer nada para solucionar el problema de la inmigración o bien, formular leyes como la SB1070, que convierten a cualquier persona que no parezca formar parte de la sociedad dominante en sospechosa.

Arizona, migratoria y víctimas se usaron 10 veces durante el mismo lapso de tiempo, lo que refleja cómo el discurso en torno a la ley SB1070 se convirtió en tema de interés durante los meses investigados. Dicha ley tuvo origen en Arizona y migratoria puede tener más relación con la posible reforma, por lo que se realizaron manifestaciones con miles de personas en la época en que se discutía la SB1070 en Arizona. Un ejemplo de cómo se utilizaba la palabra Arizona es el siguiente artículo publicado el 25 de abril de 2010: «El activista indicó que aun cuando la Ley está prevista para entrar en vigor dentro de tres meses, ha generado un clima de violencia y abusos contra la comunidad latina y no sólo contra los indocumentados, por lo que Arizona se convirtió en un lugar peligroso para cualquier persona con rasgos latinos» ( Ley Arizona, 2010 ). En esta ocasión, Arizona se usa en un contexto que ilustra que en 2010 se convirtió en un lugar peligroso para cualquiera que pareciera latino, y brinda al lector una idea de las experiencias que vivían los migrantes en tales comunidades.

Para concluir, durante la línea de tiempo en El Universal, las palabras más utilizadas describen una imagen similar a El Diario: son términos familiares que se usan para referirse a los inmigrantes mexicanos y no dejan de reconocer su experiencia en la inmigración a Estados Unidos y leyes como la SB1070.

The New York Times

Cuando finalmente se obtuvieron los resultados de los periódicos en Estados Unidos, la diferencia en el discurso fue notoria. Las siguientes palabras de mayor uso durante la línea de tiempo se utilizaron 13 veces: estadounidenses, frontera, California, delincuente, entrada en vigor, salud, país de origen, ilegales, inmigrantes, mexicanos, y seguridad. Estas palabras dan una sensación de distanciamiento del otro (el inmigrante mexicano), así como estadounidenses, frontera y país de origen. Un ejemplo del uso de las palabras ilegal e inmigrante es esta oración publicada en las noticias el 10 de febrero de 2010: «el número de inmigrantes ilegales en Estados Unidos disminuyó a 10.8 millones en enero de 2009, una disminución de un millón desde su punto más alto en 2007, según cálculos del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional anunciados el martes» ( Preston, 2010 ). Estas palabras refuerzan la noción de pertenencia a un país (Estados Unidos) y la concepción de la frontera desde la perspectiva estadounidense. Reed-Danahay y Brettell (2008) describen la pertenencia como un proceso cambiante entre las prácticas sociales de los inmigrantes y las estructuras históricas y condiciones culturales en las que viven. Para ambos autores, los discursos sobre la raza «incluso cuando se disimulan en el “nuevo” racismo, que no usa explícitamente un vocabulario racial, son parte integral de los discursos de pertenencia» (p. 19). La idea estereotipada de la frontera es que es un lugar vulnerable, violado constantemente por inmigrantes ilegales (delincuentes) que pueden propagar enfermedades (salud) o poner en peligro la seguridad del país. La relación entre lenguaje y sociedad ( Fairclough et al., 2011 ) se hace presente una vez más, pero también la perspectiva de van Dijk sobre la influencia del discurso sobre la reproducción de la dominancia social ( Santa Ana, 2002 ).

El segundo conjunto está conformado por palabras que aparecen 12 veces cada una: violencia, Estados Unidos, Arizona, detenidos, deportación, hispanos, drogas e ilegalmente y se trata del mismo tipo de discurso que se encontró en el primer conjunto. La connotación de delincuencia está presente en palabras como drogas, ilegalmente, detenidos y violencia.

La forma en la que se refieren a los inmigrantes cambia de mexicanos a hispanos, un término que no es aceptado por muchas personas que lo consideran una imposición del gobierno de los Estados Unidos porque fue el término que se utilizó en el censo de la década de 1960. América es un término usado para referirse a Estados Unidos y Arizona fue el epicentro del discurso sobre la ley SB1070. La palabra deportación está ligada con la sensación de no ser bienvenido en el país (Estados Unidos) ni pertenecer al mismo.

En resumen, las palabras que más utilizó The New York Times en artículos relacionados con temas de inmigración mexicana durante la línea de tiempo de la investigación ofrecen un discurso diferente al que se encontró en El Diario NTR y El Universal, pues las palabras que más se utilizaron tienen una connotación que implica amenaza y malicia de los inmigrantes, como lo explica van Dijk (2007) .

Los Angeles Times

Las palabras que más utilizó el periódico con sede en California durante el período de investigación se repitieron siete veces cada una: gobierno, inmigrante e inmigrantes. El primer grupo no incluye palabras muy fuertes o negativas. El segundo grupo incluía palabras que se usaron seis veces cada una y en el mismo comienza a cambiar la perspectiva: cumplimiento, inmigración y mexicano. Aplicación es la palabra más fuerte del grupo y transmite la idea de que algo debe ponerse en práctica.

El tercer conjunto de palabras tuvo una frecuencia de cinco veces, incluye ciudadanos, ilegales y legales. Nuevamente, el discurso se orienta hacia la idea de ser parte de algo, o pertenencia (ciudadanía), delincuencia y lo que es legal, como la ley SB1070, que está relacionada con el sentido de legalidad y lo que se supone es correcto.

El último grupo de palabras se repitió cuatro veces cada una: frontera, ley, país, indocumentados y violentos. Todas guardan relación con los otros grupos que más se utilizaron en Los Angeles Times. Frontera y país están relacionadas con el sentido de pertenencia, la frontera es lo que divide a dos países –en este caso, México y Estados Unidos– y lo que marca las diferencias entre los países. Indocumentados se refiere al sentido de legalidad que se tiene por tener (o carecer) de documentación migratoria que determine si una persona es nativa de ese país. Por último, violento se asocia con la idea de que los inmigrantes son delincuentes y esto se da a entender en el término ilegal, así como en la idea preconcebida de que los inmigrantes cometen delitos en Estados Unidos. Aunque Los Angeles Times no empleó un discurso tan negativo como el de The New York Times, las palabras que utilizó se asemejaban más a las que usó el periódico con sede en Nueva York. Los periódicos de Estados Unidos emplean palabras más negativas y agresivas, en comparación con los periódicos mexicanos.

Antes y después de la ley SB1070, tanto en El Diario NTR como El Universal, las referencias a inmigrantes variaban de migrantes a paisanos e indocumentados. La mayoría de las noticias en el primero eran sobre la inseguridad en México, el número de menores que regresaban de Estados Unidos e ingresaban al sistema escolar mexicano, la posibilidad de una reforma migratoria, las marchas en que participaron los latinos, la necesidad, beneficios y contribuciones locales de las remesas, los programas gubernamentales para ayudar a los inmigrantes que radican en Estados Unidos y viajan para estar con sus familias o regresar a sus hogares y el apoyo que brindan a sus comunidades los inmigrantes que viven en Estados Unidos. También había historias sobre inmigrantes que han logrado triunfar, así como las reacciones locales a la ley SB1070 de Arizona.

En El Universal, las noticias se centraron en la inseguridad existente en México y su efecto en los inmigrantes, lo mucho que han disminuido las remesas y los programas gubernamentales en general. También incluía historias de experiencias de inmigrantes y reacciones nacionales a la ley SB1070.

Tanto The New York Times como Los Angeles Times se referían a los inmigrantes como hispanos, inmigrantes, ilegales y latinos. En el primero, los artículos se referían a las manifestaciones realizadas sobre la reforma migratoria, la forma en que la inseguridad en México afectaba a los inmigrantes, la posibilidad de una reforma migratoria, el costo de la atención médica en relación cEn cuanto al discurso negativo en los periódicos de Estados Unidos, la palabra que se repetía una y otra vez era ilegal, seguida de inmigrantes y extranjeros, en segundo y tercer lugar. En el caso de los periódicos mexicanos, se empleaban las palabras ilegal, ilegales e ilegalmente, pero sólo algunas veces. Durante el análisis, esas palabras nunca formaron parte de la lista de las más usadas, en comparación con los periódicos estadounidenses, en donde ilegal fue una de las más utilizadas por varios meses, se utilizó 672 veces durante la controversia sobre la ley SB1070.  on los inmigrantes indocumentados y los ataques contra inmigrantes en el área de Nueva York. Por otro lado, en Los Angeles Times la mayoría de los artículos hablaban sobre el hecho de que los inmigrantes no recibían atención médica en las fronteras, las condiciones de trabajo de los inmigrantes, la manera en que los inmigrantes cruzaban por mar desde México, sostenían que la comida de Zacatecas era todavía mejor en México y cómo los afectaban problemas de inmigración al gobierno de Barack Obama.

En El Diario NTR, los inmigrantes se presentan como parte de la comunidad. Entretanto, en El Universal, los problemas de los inmigrantes no se trataban en un marco de confianza, como lo hacía el periódico con sede en Zacatecas. Esta diferencia es comprensible, ya que El Universal es un periódico nacional con sede en la Ciudad de México y no está ligado a las experiencias de las comunidades migrantes como las de Zacatecas.

En cuanto al discurso negativo en los periódicos de Estados Unidos, la palabra que se repetía una y otra vez era ilegal, seguida de inmigrantes y extranjeros, en segundo y tercer lugar. En el caso de los periódicos mexicanos, se empleaban las palabras ilegal, ilegales e ilegalmente, pero sólo algunas veces. Durante el análisis, esas palabras nunca formaron parte de la lista de las más usadas, en comparación con los periódicos estadounidenses, en donde ilegal fue una de las más utilizadas por varios meses, se utilizó 672 veces durante la controversia sobre la ley SB1070.

Conclusiones

Un argumento común consiste en afirmar que si las personas escuchan una mentira 1 000 veces, al final creerán que es la verdad y esto es lo que sucede con el lenguaje que emplean los medios en las noticias relacionadas con inmigrantes o temas de inmigración. Si el público escucha constantemente que los inmigrantes son ilegales, delincuentes, no son limpios o flojos, estas palabras surtirán efecto y reforzarán los estereotipos transmitidos de generación en generación y como afirmaron Stangor y Schaller (1996) , los medios de comunicación son el principal portavoz de los mismos. Por otro lado, Internet forma parte de los medios de comunicación y se ha convertido en el principal distribuidor de contenido de noticias en los últimos 30 años. Por esta razón era necesario investigar cuántas veces se usaban ciertas palabras en los periódicos, tanto en México como en Estados Unidos y limitar la búsqueda a artículos sobre temas de inmigración. Como ya se mencionó en este trabajo, existen muchos estudios sobre la forma en que los medios representan a los inmigrantes y más que cualquier otro investigador, van Dijk (2007) abordó el tema directamente cuando sugirió que los inmigrantes se presentan como parte de tres categorías: «son diferentes, son maliciosos y son una amenaza» (p. 11). Esta investigación demostró que las palabras utilizadas con mayor frecuencia en los artículos sobre inmigración en The New York Times eran delincuente, ejecución, salud, ilegal, violencia, detenidos, deportación, drogas e ilegalmente. En Los Angeles Times, las palabras más utilizadas fueron aplicación, ilegal y violencia. Todas estas palabras transmiten una connotación negativa al emplearse con mucha frecuencia en artículos sobre temas de inmigración. Fue posible confirmar el uso constante de palabras que describen a los migrantes como invasores, delincuentes u otros en la mayoría de los periódicos que se analizaron, incluidos los periódicos mexicanos. Este resultado ilustra lo comunes que se han vuelto estos términos en los medios y el hecho de que, probablemente, el público no se da cuenta hasta qué punto su uso puede perjudicar la imagen de los inmigrantes en general. En algunos de los artículos de noticias analizados, el contexto reforzaba el estereotipo de los inmigrantes que dependen de los recursos del gobierno, esta creencia se observa claramente en los medios de comunicación cuando se refieren a los inmigrantes latinos, sobre todo durante acontecimientos que generan controversia (como la propuesta, firma e implementación de la ley SB1070 en Arizona). De abril a julio de 2010 (los meses más críticos de la ley SB1070), los cuatro periódicos investigados publicaron un mayor número de artículos relacionados con temas de inmigración mexicana.

Además, uno de los resultados de esta investigación fue que los periódicos mexicanos también usaban el término ilegal ocasionalmente. Este resultado da indicios de hasta qué punto este término –que en Estados Unidos es reconocido por muchos como despectivo– se ha adoptado de forma natural en un país que, hasta hace poco, exportaba el mayor número de inmigrantes a Estados Unidos.

Es de suma importancia que los medios de comunicación estén conscientes de cómo las minorías perciben las palabras que se utilizan para representar sus culturas ante el mundo. En la actualidad, con la importancia de las redes sociales como distribuidoras de información y noticias, es fundamental comprender el poder de las palabras que usan los medios. Lamentablemente, la representación del otro en Estados Unidos no ha cambiado mucho en siglos y por ello que es tan importante llevar a cabo investigaciones que evidencien el papel que tienen los medios de comunicación en influir la percepción de las personas de aquellos que se ven o suenan diferente a ellos.

En los últimos años se han lanzado campañas que han desafiado el lenguaje que se utiliza para representar a los inmigrantes en los medios de comunicación y han exigido que los medios modifiquen su elección de las palabras. En abril y mayo de 2013, tanto el New York Times como el Los Angeles Times, decidieron no usar la palabra ilegal al referirse a los inmigrantes en las historias que publicaron. A pesar de todo, muchos medios de comunicación no han cambiado sus políticas con respecto al lenguaje que emplean.

Durante la campaña presidencial de 2016 en Estados Unidos, algunos políticos como Donald Trump definieron a los inmigrantes mexicanos como delincuentes y violadores en su discurso de lanzamiento de campaña en Nueva York. Esto hace imperativo realizar investigaciones adicionales sobre las implicaciones del uso del lenguaje de los medios y su relación con el reforzamiento de los estereotipos sobre los inmigrantes latinos en general y los mexicanos en particular.

Este tipo de investigación es importante porque el lenguaje que utilizan los medios de comunicación en sus artículos sobre inmigración determina el mensaje que recibe la sociedad e influye enormemente en la percepción de las personas que pretenden mudarse de un país a otro. Como suele decirse, las palabras importan, el lenguaje es poder y éste siempre es utilizado y aprovechado por los medios de comunicación.

EL COLEGIO DE LA FRONTERA NORTE
Todos los contenidos publicados en esta revista se encuentran bajo la licencia Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-SinDerivar 4.0 Internacional.
Licencia de Creative Commons